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Duke is also preparing for potential shutdown of nuclear reactors at least two hours before the arrival of hurricane-force winds. Duke operates 11 reactors at six sites in the Carolinas, including the Brunswick Nuclear Plant located south of Wilmington near the mouth of the Cape Fear River. The Brunswick plant’s two reactors are of the same design as those in Fukushima that exploded and leaked radiation following a 2011 earthquake and tsunami. Following that disaster, federal regulators required all U.S. nuclear plants to perform upgrades to better withstand earthquakes and flooding. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Wednesday its inspectors were on-site at nuclear plants in the storm’s path, monitoring the preparations. Regulators have also been in contact with personnel at Global Nuclear Fuels-America, a Wilmington plant that manufactures fuel rods for nuclear power plants.

Japan Times 13th Sept 2018 read more »

HURRICANE tracker analysts fear Florence’s path could smash into up to eight nuclear power plants across South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia.

Express 13th Sept 2018 read more »

Hurricane Florence No Problem For Nuclear Power Plants. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is watching carefully. But no one is really worried that much will happen, contrary to lots of antinuclear fearmongering. Power outages will occur as lines and transformers are destroyed and non-nuclear buildings get damaged, and it might takes a few days to a few weeks to bring power back up, something that includes all energy sources.

Forbes 13th Sept 2018 read more »

Duke Energy Corp (DUK.N) started to shut the Brunswick nuclear power plant in North Carolina ahead of Hurricane Florence, which is expected to strike the coast near the plant on Friday. Florence is currently a Category 2 storm with maximum sustained winds of 110 miles per hour (177 kph), according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC). On its current track, the storm will hit the coast on Friday with maximum sustained winds of about 105 mph.

Reuters 13th Sept 2018 read more »

A legal battle has flared up over the only new nuclear power plant under construction in the US, raising questions about the $27bn project’s future. Companies involved in the plan to build two reactors in Georgia have sued each other over a contract to buy electricity from the plant, as communities argue over who should bear the rising cost of the project. The outcome of the dispute will have implications for the nuclear industry in the US and internationally. The two Westinghouse AP1000 reactors being built at the Vogtle power plant in Georgia have been hit by delays and cost overruns, but the companies leading the project are still pressing ahead with construction. However, the city of Jacksonville in Florida and its electric utility JEA, which had agreed to buy power from the plant for 20 years, are attempting to escape from that contract. In a filing at a Florida court on Wednesday, the city argued that the 2008 agreement to buy power from the plant was in breach of state law and therefore unenforceable. In their filing, Jacksonville and JEA said the contract “purports to saddle JEA and its ratepayers with an unlimited obligation to fund the exorbitant and ever-ballooning cost of constructing units of a nuclear power plant that JEA does not own”.

FT 13th Sept 2018 read more »

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Published: 14 September 2018