News

17 September 2009

Nuclear Subsidy

The promise of nil subsidy lasted as long as it took for the ink to dry on £13bn contract. According to both The Times and The Telegraph energy companies have told the Government their pledge not to use public aid to fund the £40 billion rollout of new nuclear power stations is no longer realistic. There is a consensus in the industry that without help new reactors will not be built. One option being discussed is a levy tacked on to household fuel bills, another is to set a “floor price” for carbon.

Paul Flynn MP 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Nuclear Economics

There’s a new paper out from Spanish researchers at Universidad Pontificia Comillas exploring nuclear economics. It concludes on a pessimistic note: “Looking at the past history of nuclear would then result in concluding that nuclear will probably not be competitive on a purely economic basis. Therefore, cost will not be a plus for nuclear, but will still be one of its problems.” Governments might yet have to find a way to make the numbers work. The trick, as the paper notes, will be in figuring out how to divvy up finite government money for seemingly infinite energy interests.

Wall Street Journal 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Hinkley

The National Grid has announced plans for a new 37-mile 400,000 volt overhead pylon line connecting Hinkley Point in Somerset to a substation in Avonmouth. The company has been asked to connect a 3,600MW nuclear power station to be built close to the existing generating plant at Hinkley Point.

BBC 16th Sept 2009 more >>

This is Somerset 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Oldbury

New nuclear has finally kicked-off with the start of ground investigation for the next generation of power stations. Geotechnical contractor Hydrock began preliminary work at Oldbury, Gloucestershire, on behalf of energy giant E.on. Oldbury is one of 11 sites proposed by the government to host new nuclear power stations. Drilling for 22 boreholes between 40m and 80m in depth began on 3 August. Hydrock director Dr Adam Fisher said: “We have been working in the new nuclear build programme for the past 18 months and it forms a major part of our growth strategy. This is a complex and critical piece of work.”

New Civil Engineer 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Companies

Engineering firm Rolls-Royce is to collaborate with French power firm EDF to build four new nuclear power plants.The European Pressurised Reactors are to be built at Hinkley Point and Sizewell. The first should be operational by the end of 2017, while all four should be on stream by 2025. “The agreement covers engineering and technical support during both the pre- and post-construction phases,” Rolls-Royce said, announcing the project with EDF Energy, the UK division of the French utility group.

AFP 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Reuters 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Business East Midlands 17th Sept 2009 more >>

Proactive Investors 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Money Week 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Times 17th Sept 2009 more >>

Telegraph 17th Sept 2009 more >>

US reactor designer Westinghouse is understood to have shortlisted two consortia for the job of building its nuclear power stations in the UK. The consortia said to be in final talks are Shaw Group (in conjunction with Laing O’Rourke) and Fluor alongside Costain/Sir Robert McAlpine/Hochtief joint venture. The big electricity utilities have yet to decide whether to use the Westinghouse AP1000 or rival Areva EPR model. But RWE is said to be in advanced talks with the US firm.

Contract Journal 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Trident

Bob Ainsworth, the Defence Secretary, exposed a potential Cabinet clash over the fate of the Trident replacement programme, which could cost £20billion. Speaking at King’s College, London, Mr Ainsworth insisted: “There is no intention on this Government’s part of moving away from our position on Trident.” The Government declared in a White Paper published in December 2006 that it intended to replace the existing Trident ballistic-missile deterrent by 2024. Mr Ainsworth said that the only decision still to be taken was whether the Government would order three or four submarines to carry the deterrent.

Times 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Daily Mirror 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Tories, Lib Dems and now Labour are all signalling that the upgrade for the UK’s Trident nuclear missile system could be dumped on the altar of cost cutting. How is this for interesting comments from Government chief whip Nick Brown? “The Government hasn’t decided to build a new generation of missile carrying submarines. “The study is underway now and I would rather see the study before making a decision. But clearly all options have to be considered.”

Newcastle Journal 16th Sept 2009 more >>

REPLACING the Trident weapons system would cost Oldham taxpayers a staggering £183 million, according to anti-nuclear campaigners. Saddleworth Peace Movement heard from Rae Street, chairman of Greater Manchester Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND), that the overall cost to Greater Manchester would be £2.458 billion.

Oldham Chronicle 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Missile Defence

Barack Obama has abandoned the US’s controversial plan to build a missile-defence system in Europe in one of the sharpest breaks yet with the policies of the Bush administration, according to reports from Washington today

Guardian 17th Sept 2009 more >>

Telegraph 17th Sept 2009 more >>

Germany

The German edition of the respected Financial Times newspaper claims Research Minister Annette Schavan has been sitting on plans for new atomic plants, despite an official policy of phasing them out. Indeed, Berlin has just approved the building of thousands of new wind turbines in the Baltic, to appease critics who say they are ugly and ruin the countryside. The nuclear issue is unlikely to harm Chancellor Angela Merkel as she heads into an election as the expected victor. But it gives her rival Frank-Walter Steinmeier an opportunity to attack her, especially as she is eyeing a post-election coalition with the Free Democrats, who have long been keen supporters of atomic energy.

Euro News 16th Sept 2009 more >>

German chancellor Angela Merkel’s CDU party, which is widely expected to win the largest share of votes in the country’s 27 September parliamentary elections, has adapted its pro-nuclear policy in reaction to renewed anti-nuclear protests. The CDU remains intent on revising the country’s nuclear phase-out law in the coming legislative period should it stay in power, a CDU politician tells Argus. This is in contrast to expectations by some analysts in recent weeks that the CDU may want to postpone such a move to the following legislative period. Delaying a revision of the phase-out for four years will be too late for too many nuclear plants, the CDU source says. Merkel has kept a low profile on the nuclear issue in the election campaign. The mood among voters has shifted against nuclear again after a much publicised incident at the 1,346MW Krummel plant in July, and renewed protests this summer over the Gorleben interim nuclear waste storage site in Lower Saxony.

Argus Media 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Italy

Italian ministers and officials were today holding urgent consultations following the discovery of an unmarked wreck that prosecutors believe was used by the mafia to sink radioactive waste. As a ship carrying equipment for detecting marine pollution headed for the site of the sunken vessel, an investigator said up to 41 others may have been used to dump toxic and nuclear material on the seabed.

Guardian 17th Sept 2009 more >>

Climate

Don’t expect China to keep global warming below 2C, a senior government adviser warned in Beijing today at the launch of an influential report on the nation’s prospects for low-carbon growth. Even in a best-case scenario with massive investment in solar and carbon capture technology, Dai Yande, deputy chief of the Energy Research Institute, said China’s emissions were unlikely to fall low enough to remain below the temperature goal recommended by the G8 and European Union.

Guardian 17th Sept 2009 more >>

Posted: 17 September 2009

16 September 2009

Uranium

The fact that a British jury found uranium to have been the cause of death of a soldier has been labelled “highly significant” by Cumbrian anti-nuclear campaigners.

Get Noticed Online 15th Sept 2009 more >>

Nuclear Status

According to official data released today by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), nuclear electricity generation in OECD member countries has only marginally declined despite the economic downturn. Nuclear power plants provided 21.5% of the total electricity generated in the OECD area in 2008 against 21.6% in 2007.

Nuclear Engineering International 15th Sept 2009 more >>

Hutton

Cumbrian MP John Hutton, who as Business Secretary pushed for a nuclear power renaissance in the UK, could be taking up a job with the world’s biggest nuclear power station operator.

Carlisle News and Star 15th Sept 2009 more >>

New Civil Engineer 15th Sept 2009 more >>

Nuclear Skills

New apprentices at Sellafield’s Gen II have started training at the Energus nuclear skills HQ at Lillyhall, Workington.

Carlisle News and Star 15th Sept 2009 more >>

Companies

Russia is firming up plans to enter the nuclear energy market in the UK. The state-owned Atomenergoprom (AEP) is understood to be considering to team up with Centrica, a part of the British Gas Group, and Rolls-Royce to become a key player in the UK.

Energy Business Review 14th Sept 2009 more >>

Reprocessing

Article by Frank Von Hippel: The Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository project is now comatose, if not dead. And that puts us back at square one on a crucial question: What are we going to do with all the radioactive waste being discharged by U.S. nuclear power reactors? Many conservatives on Capitol Hill favor the French “solution”: spent-fuel reprocessing. But reprocessing isn’t a solution at all: It’s a very expensive and dangerous detour.

LA Times 15th Sept 2009 more >>

Emergency Planning

SAFETY chiefs have been accused of failing to justify a plan to cut the number of homes in Southampton that would get anti-radiation pills in a nuclear accident. They want to reduce from 2km to 1.5km a safety zone around the berth in the port used by visiting nuclear-powered submarines.

Southern Daily Echo 15th Sept 2009 more >>

Climate

Europe has clashed with the US Obama administration over climate change in a potentially damaging split that comes ahead of crucial political negotiations on a new global deal to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. The Guardian understands that key differences have emerged between the US and Europe over the structure of a new worldwide treaty on global warming. Sources on the European side say the US approach could undermine the new treaty and weaken the world’s ability to cut carbon emissions.

Guardian 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Telegraph 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Human society faces a global health catastrophe if climate change is not effectively tackled at the UN conference in Copenhagen in December, leading doctors from around the world warn today.

Independent 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Tom Burke: climate change already causes some 300,000 deaths a year and seriously affects 325 million people. It concluded that four billion people were vulnerable to climate change and half a billion at extreme risk. The number of people permanently displaced by rising sea levels, floods and droughts could reach 150 to 200 million by 2050.

Independent 16th Sept 2009 more >>

The World Bank is spending billions of pounds subsidising new coal-fired power stations in developing countries despite claiming that burning fossil fuels exposes the poor to catastrophic climate change. The bank, which has a goal of reducing poverty and is funded by Britain and other developed countries, calls on all nations in a report today to “act differently on climate change”.

Times 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Renewables

Letter from Prof David Elliott: If I am travelling down an “irrational” road to renewables, as Richard Phillips implies then I am not alone. Last year, solar PV generation capacity grew by 70% around the world, wind power by 29% and solar hot water increased by 15%. By 2008, renewables represented more than 50% of total added generation capacity in both the US and Europe, ie more new renewables capacity was installed than new capacity for gas, coal, oil, and nuclear combined; with no emissions, no wastes and no security issues to worry about – and no worries about fuel running out, or increasing in price.

Guardian 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Italy

A shipwreck that could contain nuclear waste is being investigated by authorities in Italy amid claims that it was deliberately sunk by the mafia. An informant told a judge the ship was one of a number he blew up as part of an illegal operation to bypass rules on the disposal of toxic waste.

BBC 15th Sept 2009 more >>

Iran

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has said Iran must answer “head on” concerns about its nuclear programme at talks with world powers on 1 October.

BBC 16th Sept 2009 more >>

If Iran gets nuclear weapons, Israel will make a military attack on it. That was the most dramatic pronouncement from the launch of the strategic survey from the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), its annual stocktaking of the world’s problems.

Times 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Iran has agreed new terms of co-operation with the UN atomic watchdog regarding the agency’s investigation into Tehran’s nuclear activities.

Telegraph 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Spain

Spain’s oldest nuclear power station filed an appeal on Monday against a government decision to close the 500-megawatt plant in 2013, operators Nuclenor said on their website.

Yahoo 15th Sept 2009 more >>

Trident

The number of submarines in a new fleet designed to carry the UK’s independent nuclear deterrent could be cut from four to three, the defence secretary said on Tuesday. In a sign that ministers are looking at reducing spending on big military programmes, Bob Ainsworth said the government would consider slimming the submarine fleet due to replace the current Vanguard class that carries the Trident-based system.

FT 16th Sept 2009 more >>

Posted: 16 September 2009

15 September 2009

Hutton

FURNESS MP John Hutton, who as Business Secretary pushed for a nuclear power renaissance in the UK, could be taking up a job with the world’s biggest nuclear power station operator.

NW Evening Mail 14th Sept 2009 more >>

Sizewell

THE EADT is today launching a campaign to oppose plans for a new line of gigantic power pylons across the beautiful south Suffolk countryside. National Grid is looking to link an extra set of cables between its substation in Bramford, near Ipswich, and a power junction in Twinstead, near Sudbury. The energy giant says the extra line is needed to help accommodate increased demand and the future generation of electricity along the Suffolk coast, including a planned new nuclear plant at Sizewell. However, pylons were first put up across the UK in the 1960s and many feel there should be a more efficient, environmentally friendly and aesthetically pleasing way of conducting power in the 21st century.

East Anglian Daily Times 14th Sept 2009 more >>

Sellafield

A NUCLEAR disaster will be acted out at schools and organisations near Sellafield in a day long test to check their “readiness” in case of an emergency. The nuclear plant’s siren will be let off and emergency services deployed during the test, named Oscar 9. The alert exercise will take place at various sites across the Sellafield plant and at the West Cumbria Emergency Control Centre in Whitehaven on September 24.

NW Evening Mail 14th Sept 2009 more >>

IAEA

The new head of the world’s nuclear watchdog has vowed to pursue alleged illegal proliferation of atomic technology, saying the spread of such knowledge threatens international peace. Yukiya Amano takes over the International Atomic Energy Agency in December. His predecessor still suspects Iran of a weapons programme despite its denials.

Euro News 14th Sept 2009 more >>

Trident

THE Government should look at scrapping major projects such as renewing the Trident nuclear deterrent before it orders cuts in council services, says Jeremy Guise, TUC assistant secretary for Plymouth, and Unison’s TUC representative.

Plymouth Herald 15th Sept 2009 more >>

Iran

The US and other world powers will next month meet Tehran’s chief nuclear negotiator to test the seriousness of Iran’s proposal for talks and gauge its willingness to discuss its uranium enrichment programme.

FT 15th Sept 2009 more >>

Times 15th Sept 2009 more >>

Guardian 15th Sept 2009 more >>

Iran is not prepared to bargain over its right to a nuclear programme but world powers will be able to raise any question they wish at upcoming talks, a senior Iranian official said.

Independent 15th Sept 2009 more >>

Posted: 15 September 2009

14 September 2009

Hutton

Today it is reported that Mr Hutton will be appointed to nuclear power company EDF’s Stakeholder Advisory Panel, which advises the firm’s senior management, and includes Lord Patten, the former Tory Cabinet Minister and last Governor of Hong Kong. It’s called the ‘revolving door. PASC gave Richard Caborn and Lord Warners a roasting about taking vast sums in exchange for their ministerial contacts and ‘expertise.’ We pointed out in our report that Ministers settling contracts might have an eye on the possibility of a fat salary when they step down as ministers. We thought that there is a grave danger that contracts could be awarded for the wrong reasons. We made a major point of this peril in our report. My conviction is that ministers should be banned for life from working in companies that received contracts from them in their ministerial incarnations.

Paul Flynn MP 13th Sept 2009 more >>

The former business secretary John Hutton, who championed the government’s push towards a new generation of nuclear stations, is in talks with French-owned nuclear energy company EDF about joining their group as an adviser. Hutton, who is to leave parliament at the next election, served as business secretary from 2007-08 and announced the government’s decision to build new nuclear reactors. As business secretary in September 2008, he also oversaw the £12.5bn sale of British Energy, the nuclear generator, to EDF, which is 83%-owned by the French state.

Guardian 14th Sept 2009 more >>

Electricity Supplies

Ed Miliband, the Energy Secretary, has dismissed the prospect of mass power cuts in the UK over the next decade. He said the issue was more a question of whether power needs were met from ‘‘sustainable’’ sources or traditional carbon fuels. The intervention came after the Government’s own new energy adviser warned that green energy was being developed too slowly.

Telegraph 14th Sept 2009 more >>

Companies

A Russian state-owned nuclear firm is attempting to break into the UK market with direct approaches to British firms, it has been reported. Atomenergoprom is thought to have made contact with British Gas owner Centrica and manufacturing giant Rolls-Royce as it looks to become a major player in the UK and beyond. The firm has already signed a joint venture with Toshiba, whose Westinghouse subsidiary runs the UK’s main nuclear manufacturing site, Springfields, near Preston.

Loughborough News 13th Sept 2009 more >>

EDF

Henri Proglio, chief executive of Veolia Environnement, the French water and waste management group, has been selected by President Sarkozy to take over as the head of EDF, the state electricity giant.

Times 14th Sept 2009 more >>

Venezuela

Venezuela President Hugo Chavez said the South American country plans to develop a nuclear energy program with Russia and doesn’t want to build an atomic bomb.

Bloomberg 13th Sept 2009 more >>

Iran

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has said Iran is ready to discuss global issues with world powers, but that its nuclear programme is non-negotiable.

BBC 13th Sept 2009 more >>

Herald 13th Sept 2009 more >>

The issue of Iran’s nuclear programme reared its head again last week , even though it received comparatively little attention on an American political stage dominated by the battle over healthcare reform. Four days ago, Glyn Davies, the US envoy to the International Atomic Energy Agency, warned that Iran had advanced further than previously thought in the process of developing a nuclear bomb.

Sunday Business Post 13th Sept 2009 more >>

Israel

Obama has shown no inclination to address the perils that this entangled alliance with Jewish extremists imposes on US national security and on the prospects for peace. The focal point for peace in the Middle East should not be those nations that do not have nuclear weapons but the one nation that does.

Middle East Online 14th Sept 2009 more >>

Energy Efficiency

The Government’s low-carbon transition plan comprises five key points, ranging from securing international climate agreements to action on carbon budgets. All the points are important, but it is the fifth that will make the real difference “supporting individuals, communities and businesses to play their part”. This plan will work only if individual consumers embrace it and change their behaviour. This change must be significant and go much further than simply switching the television off standby or installing a few low-energy light bulbs. Its success depends on motivating individual consumers to make energy efficiency a priority.We have an opportunity comparable to mobile phones and the internet to transform our energy supply by augmenting large-scale power generation with community and consumer contributions.

Times 14th Sept 2009 more >>

Posted: 14 September 2009

13 September 2009

Hutton

The Cabinet Minister behind a £12.5billion nuclear power deal with French-owned energy giant EDF is set to take a highly-paid job with the firm. John Hutton’s proposed move comes just a year after the former Business Secretary gave the go-ahead for the firm to buy many of Britain’s existing and future nuclear power plants.

Mail on Sunday 13th Sept 2009 more >>

Companies

The Russians have unveiled bold ambitions to break into the British nuclear market in a move which could revive nervousness about the Kremlin’s use of energy as a political weapon. State-owned Atomenergoprom has already signed a joint venture with Toshiba, whose Westinghouse subsidiary manages the UK’s main nuclear fuel manufacturing plant at Springfields in Lancashire. It is in talks about a similar arrangement with Siemens, which wants to become a significant supplier to a new generation of reactors in this country.

Observer 13th Sept 2009 more >>

Sellafield

The German newspaper “Die Welt” reports that the planned shipping of MOX fuel from Sellafield to Grohnde NPP will not be transported within the next 2 months.

Welt online 11th Sept 2009 more >>

Submarines

An 11-year investigation into how to safely dismantle 15 decommissioned nuclear-powered submarines has been thrown into turmoil after two of the environmental experts brought in as advisers were sacked. Deep disagreements have split the 25-member advisory group, with eight consultants now considering resignation, the Observer understands. Since 1998, the Ministry of Defence has been looking for ways of dismantling the submarines and storing their radioactive waste on land. Ministers set up the Interim Storage of Laid Up Submarines (Isolus) programme to look into what plans would be acceptable to the public. Jane Hunt and Bill Thompson, of Lancaster University’s Centre for the Study of Environmental Change, ran two consultations for Isolus in 2001 and in 2003. But, according to Hunt, the MoD did not understand the need for close public scrutiny of radioactive waste management. She also claimed officials dismissed worries about the health effects of low-level radiation from dismantling reactors.

Observer 13th Sept 2009 more >>

Iran

IRAN is not ruling out talks about its nuclear programme with world powers but conditions for that have to be right, the country’s top diplomat said yesterday. In a statement that appeared to soften Tehran’s position, Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki said he welcomed talks with the United States and its partners, adding that “should conditions be ripe, there is a possibility of talks about the nuclear issue”.

Scotland on Sunday 13th Sept 2009 more >>

Korea

THE US is hoping to re-open talks with North Korea over its nuclear program. The US state department have announced they are trying to bring the reclusive communist state back to the negotiating table.

Times 12th Sept 2009 more >>

The US State Department has said that it is willing to hold direct talks with North Korea, if it will help persuade them to return to the six-party talks aimed at dismantling Pyongyang’s nuclear programme.

Telegraph 12th Sept 2009 more >>

Posted: 13 September 2009

12 September 2009

EDF

John Hutton, the former Business Secretary who was the architect of Britain’s plans to build a series of nuclear power stations, is in talks with EDF about joining the group as a senior adviser. EDF also confirmed yesterday that Lord Patten of Barnes, the former Conservative Cabinet minister and last Governor of Hong Kong, had joined the group in recent months in a similar role.

Times 12th Sept 2009 more >>

Wylfa & Oldbury

German utilities E.ON and RWE do not expect their first nuclear reactor in Britain to start operating until 2019, an E.ON executive said. “Our target for the first unit is 2019,” said Ralf Gueldner, vice chairman of the management board at E.ON Kernkraft GmbH. The launch could be postponed if there are any delays in the government’s safety assessment of the reactor designs or if it had any questions about them, Gueldner said. He spoke to Reuters on the sidelines of the World Nuclear Association Symposium in London. In April, the EON-RWE joint venture bought land at auction at Wylfa in Wales and Oldbury in south west England. It is planning to built 6 gigawatts of nuclear generators at the two sites.

Yahoo 11th Sept 2009 more >>

British Energy

Six nuclear power units were out of service, including Dungeness B21, Hartlepool 1, Heysham 1-2 and Sizewell B2.

Reuters 11th Sept 2009 more >>

Emergency Planning

COMPANIES from across the country will take part in a nuclear alert exercise at Sellafield later this month. Cumbria County Council and Sellafield Ltd will be hosting the exercise, named Oscar 9, on Thursday September 24. The exercise will be based around the Sellafield site and the West Cumbria Emergency Control Centre at the Summergrove complex near Whitehaven.

NW Evening Mail 11th Sept 2009 more >>

New Nukes

A nuclear plant as the setting for a new hit TV series? Popular entertainment media could prove to be more effective at engaging public support and acceptance for nuclear energy than past industry attempts to convince the world of nuclear’s merits.

World Nuclear News 11th Sept 2009 more >>

GE Hitachi

GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy said on Wednesday it has submitted the revised design documents for its Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. GE Hitachi said the submission marks a milestone in the company’s effort to move forward with the 1,520-megawatt design which two U.S. utilities have selected to use for two new nuclear plants, some of the first reactors proposed after a three-decade lapse in U.S. nuclear expansion.

Energy Tribune 11th Sept 2009 more >>

Springfields

Energy giant Westinghouse Electric Company has revealed it is in “advanced discussions” with the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority over plans for the Springfields nuclear fuel site near Preston, which include making a significant investment.

Construction News 11th Sept 2009 more >>

India

GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy said on Friday it was in talks with India’s state-owned nuclear power body to build at least 6 nuclear reactors.

Reuters 11th Sept 2009 more >>

Germany

Chancellor Angela Merkel’s government said it will review whether politicians influenced a 1983 scientific study about the safety of a proposed underground nuclear waste site in northern Germany. As Merkel seeks a second term in Sept. 27 elections, German newspapers reported last month that former Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s government allegedly pressed scientists to say the site near the village of Gorleben is safe for radioactive waste.

Bloomberg 11th Sept 2009 more >>

Submarines

A LEADING environmental activist has attacked a campaign to stop nuclear submarine decommissioning at Devonport Dockyard. Roger Creagh-Osborne, a Green Party candidate in this year’s European Parliament elections, defended the “professionalism and skill” of the nuclear workers in the dockyard. “The issue of Trident and its decommissioning simply does not have the urgency of the real climate crisis we face,” Mr Creagh-Osborne, who works at Plymouth University and is chairman of St Germans parish council, said. The Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND) is to hold protest marches in Plymouth on October 31 to protest against plans to decommission nuclear submarines at the Dockyard.

Plymouth Herald 12th Sept 2009 more >>

Iran

The six major powers negotiating with Tehran over its nuclear programme judge the latest proposals from Iran to be insufficient and are to seek an urgent meeting, an EU official said Friday.

EU Business 11th Sept 2009 more >>

The United States has rejected Iran’s latest proposals over its nuclear programme, dampening hopes for new talks aimed at breaking a three-year impasse.

Telegraph 12th Sept 2009 more >>

Energy Efficiency

Under the plan, to be launched in Edinburgh by the Co-operative party at its annual conference today, local residents will join schools, community organisations and businesses to form consumer energy co-ops. These would negotiate with wholesale energy groups to supply gas and electricity at between 10 and 20% less than the normal domestic price. A modest step towards reducing emissions would occur at this first stage because the co-ops would install smart meters in members’ homes. A bigger step in cutting emissions would occur later when co-ops install environmentally friendly technology, including combined heat and power systems (CHP), heat pumps or biomass boilers. CHP is the process by which heat generated at power stations while creating energy supplies is captured and used to heat the homes of local people.

Guardian 12th Sept 2009 more >>

Posted: 12 September 2009

11 September 2009

New Nukes

Letters: (1) Professor David Elliott deploys a most tenuous argument against nuclear power. The flavour of the moment, wind, is a “take-it-when-you-get-it-source”, needing some 80% fossil backup. I am surprised that an academic of Professor Elliott’s provenance should have travelled so far down this irrational road. (2) Chief among the reasons nuclear power is poorly matched to the needs of less-developed regions is the huge upfront capital investment required for up to a decade before a single kilowatt-hour is generated. Nuclear looks like just another way of delivering big bucks to the big boys, probably via big bribes to the local elite.

Guardian 11th Sept 2009 more >>

A ‘one-stop shop’ for all you want to know about the Westinghouse AP1000 reactor unit has been launched in the UK. Westinghouse UK’s new website – www.ukap1000application.com – has been designed to support the Generic Design Assessment (GDA) process being run by the UK’s nuclear regulators.

Whitehaven News 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Nuclear Skills

Establishing and running the next generation of nuclear power plants in the UK will place a new set of demands on the industry’s skills base, according to a new report by Cogent Sector Skills Council – the national skills body for the Nuclear Industry. Replacing the current fleet of nuclear power stations represents a multibillion pound private sector investment programme, but one which is dependent on a highly skilled workforce, said the report, called Power People: The Civil Nuclear Workforce 2009 to 2025.

Process Engineering 10th Sept 2009 more >>

People Management 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Politics.co.uk 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Consultant Atkins will open its nuclear training academy to other companies working in the nuclear industry. The news comes on the back of a report by nuclear skills body Cogent, who estimate that 1,000 new nuclear engineers must be trained every year until 2025 to maintain and decomission our existing nuclear infrastructure.

New Civil Engineer 10th Sept 2009 more >>

THE TEES Valley must upskill its nuclear workforce to take full advantage of the nuclear renaissance coming its way, according to a new report. The industry needs a thousand new recruits every year if the current level of nuclear power generation is to be maintained to 2025 and beyond.

Newcastle Evening Gazette 10th Sept 2009 more >>

THIS week marks the end of an era at the GEN II training centre at Sellafield as apprentice training relocates to the new Energus facility at Lillyhall

Whitehaven News 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Springfields

Toshiba Corp nuclear power unit Westinghouse Electric Co. said Thursday it is in advanced talks to take over site management at the U.K. Nuclear Decommissioning Authority’s nuclear fuel operations at Springfields near Preston in northern England. The arrangements include the permanent transfer of ownership of Springfields Fuels Ltd., the company managing the site, and a long-term lease when the current site management contract ends in March 2010.

Wall Street Journal 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Westinghouse Electric Company is in talks to take over the UK Fuel site at Springfields near Preston in a move which a union leader claims could create 500 jobs over the next five years.

Crain’s Manchester Business 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Chapelcross

THE DEFUELLING and decommissioning of Chapelcross Nuclear Power Station near Annan is ahead of schedule and under budget. The 583-strong workforce, including contractors, are celebrating a new milestone – the start of defuelling nuclear rods from Reactor 3 for reprocessing at Sellafield in Cumbria. It means that two of the site’s four reactors are now being defuelled. Up until last week, the 18 flasks of nearly 2,500 fuel elements taken to Sellafield so far all came from Reactor 1.

Dumfries and Galloway Standard 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Proliferation

A.Q. Khan, the nuclear scientist renowned as the architect of Pakistan’s atomic weapons programme bomb, has boasted of how he helped Iran to develop its own capability to “neutralise” Israel’s power in the Middle East.

Telegraph 11th Sept 2009 more >>

Uranium

Nuclear energy’s fuel supply infrastructure should be able to meet world demand in the short term, but expansion will be needed across the entire fuel cycle beyond 2020, warns the latest WNA market report.

The newly released report, The Global Nuclear Fuel Market Supply and Demand 2009-2030, is the fifteenth in a series which started in the mid-1970s.

World Nuclear News 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Sellafield

SEVENTEEN construction workers have lost their jobs at Sellafield. The group was made redundant last week, by contractors Laing O’Rourke, after a stage of a store construction project came to an end. Those who have left include 11 local workers and six from away

Whitehaven News 10th Sept 2009 more >>

SELLAFIELD’S operators have hit back at anti-nuclear claims that there is “a hidden agenda” behind major developments which will take place on the nearby beach. Sellafield Ltd has planning permission for marine access work, including a bridge over the River Ehen and a ramp across one section of the beach. This is so that sea barges can bring in large components for constructing a new £380 million evaporator, vital to the site’s long-term future. The work has nothing to do with the possible construction of new nuclear reactors around Sellafield or further along the coast at Braystones and Kirksanton.

Whitehaven News 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Finland

A war of words has erupted again between nuclear reactor builder Areva and Finnish utility Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO), as the French firm wrote off hundreds of millions of euros in profits because of the troubled Olkiluoto reactor project. In first-half results, Areva said operating profit would be just 16 million because of a 550 million provision related to the construction of its next generation European Press-urised Water (EPR) reactor at Olkiluoto.

Professional Engineering 9th Sept 2009 more >>

China

Chinese officials have signed a deal with America’s First Solar, the world’s largest manufacturer of solar cells, to convert a remote desert area of inner Mongolia into a giant power station. First Solar, based in Arizona, said that the plant would be the largest solar station on the planet and would eventually involve carpeting 25 square miles of the remote Chinese province an area roughly the size of Manhattan with gleaming panels. Once completed, in 2019, the site will generate 2,000 megawatts of electricity equivalent to nearly double the output of the Dungeness nuclear power station and enough to power three million Chinese homes.

Times 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Iran

The US says it is unhappy with the package of proposals submitted by Iran on Wednesday aimed at breaking the deadlock over its nuclear ambitions.

BBC 11th Sept 2009 more >>

Middle East Online 11th Sept 2009 more >>

Herald 11th Sept 2009 more >>

An Iranian proposal made public Thursday offers wide-ranging talks with the West but is silent about its nuclear program, a mixed message that may undercut any push for further U.N. sanctions on Iran for now.

Reuters 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Iran has proposed a global system to eliminate nuclear weapons, as well as cooperation on Afghanistan and fighting terrorism, but will not discuss halting its uranium enrichment program, an Iranian official was quoted as saying today.

Irish Times 11th Sept 2009 more >>

Germany

Even with the growth of renewable energy, the intermittent nature of the sun and wind mean these sources cannot replace nuclear power without costly investments in energy storage and transmission. Replacing nuclear plants with coal-fired ones seems equally far-fetched. To keep the lights burning, Germany may ultimately have to choose between missing its targets to reduce greenhouse gasses or becoming more beholden to Russia for natural gas. That debate could turn radioactive.

Economist 10th Sept 2009 more >>

In Germany, fresh claims about nuclear contamination have threatened to derail the Christian Democrats election campaign. The Enviroment Minister said the CDU government in the 1980’s tampered with a report to play down the risks of using Gorleben as a permament site for atomic waste.

Euro News 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Der Spiegel 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Ukraine

British engineers are helping to secure dangerous nuclear materials left over from the Soviet Union by building a central store for them inside the former Chernobyl plant in Ukraine.

Professional Engineering 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Energy Efficiency

A neglected 30-year-old power-saving technology could cut electricity consumption by TVs, computers and other electronic devices by up to 50pc if it was installed world-wide.

Telegraph 11th Sept 2009 more >>

Posted: 11 September 2009

10 September 2009

New Nukes

Insurers won’t cover energy companies against the risk of a Chernobyl-style nuclear accident, forcing the government to self insure planned new nuclear power stations, the Times reports. The Department of Energy and Climate Change has appointed PricewaterhouseCoopers to set out how the government could insure the proposed new nuclear power stations.

Insurance Times 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Springfields

More than 500 jobs are set to be created after a long term lease was clinched at a Preston nuclear fuels site. Operator Westinghouse has signed a new deal with the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) which will also assure around 1,500 current jobs at the Springfields site in Salwick over the next five years. Bill Hamilton, of the NDA, said: “It will play a role in providing nuclear fuel as part of the nuclear fuel renaissance around the globe.

Lancashire Evening Post 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Southport Visiter 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Huddersfield Examiner 10th Sept 2009 more >>

A plant producing nuclear fuel for the new generation of reactors is set to be developed at Springfields in Lancashire, safeguarding 1,400 jobs at the site and securing for British industry some of the benefits of the revival of nuclear power. Westinghouse, the privatised nuclear engineering company now owned by Toshiba of Japan, will say on Thursday that it is in advanced talks with the government’s Nuclear Decommissioning Authority to take a long-term lease on the Springfields nuclear fuel assembly plant.

FT 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Uranium

Uranium and nuclear projects in Africa, Australia and Russia are set to be the recipients of funds raised by two separate financing moves announced by Russian state nuclear company Rosatom and Australia-based uranium company Paladin. Rosatom announced its plans for a major bond offering worth up to 195 billion roubles (US$6.3 billion) through its subsidiary AtomEnergoProm. The five-year 1000-rouble bonds will be sold through the MICEX stock exchange, with Rosatom acting as guarantor. Paladin Energy has also announced its plans to raise its own funding through an institutional private placement of shares. The placement is expected to be for up to 15% of the company’s issued capital.

World Nuclear News 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Energy Security

It looks like Russia is once again gently reminding Europe that its hand hovers over the gas tap supplying 25pc of the continent’s needs this winter. It’s still only early September and sparks are already flying with Ukraine, which transports the gas from east to west in pipelines. It’s almost irrelevant what they are squabbling about. The UK doesn’t get its gas through pipes from Russia, as most comes from Norway and the North Sea, topped up with liquefied natural gas (LNG), which can be easily stored. But when other European countries run short, they are willing to pay whatever it takes to get their hands on LNG from storage facilities, diverting reserves from the UK to continental Europe. Often the supertankers simply turn around in the middle of the ocean and head in the other direction when one country outbids another.

Telegraph 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Radiation and Health

At the start of the Cold War, Stalin chose one of the furthest outposts of his empire to test the Soviet Union’s first nuclear bombs. Sixty years on, their cancerous legacy is still being felt. It is the names of Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Chernobyl that stand for the horrors of the new technology. The name of Semipalatinsk has no such resonance, and is all but forgotten. Yet nowhere else in the world was there such a large concentration of nuclear explosions in one place over such a long period. When Beria earmarked this far eastern corner of Kazakhstan to be the Soviet Union’s top secret nuclear test facility, he described the place as “uninhabited” – conveniently forgetting the 700,000 people who lived in the surrounding villages, towns and cities. Overnight the region was deleted from the map and for the next 40 years Soviet scientists detonated 615 nuclear devices at their secret Semipalatinsk Polygon.

Independent 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Australia

The nuclear debate in Australia has been stepped up by a declaration from Ziggy Switkowski, chairman of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (Ansto), that there is no impediment to the country using 50 reactors for power by mid-century. The level of the political nuclear debate in Australia has lagged behind that in media and business circles, with many commentators wondering about the contradiction of the country’s position: Nuclear power is forbidden even though the country is the world’s leading exporter of uranium and officially recognises the mineral’s benefits in climate protection. Meanwhile, the vast bulk of power is generated from coal and the country is among the highest per capita carbon emitters.

World Nuclear News 9th Sept 2009 more >>

US

On Wednesday, General Electric claimed a significant step toward getting one of its advanced reactor designs, the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor, approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission although the model has recently lost most of its customers. Westinghouse, in contrast, has customers lined up for its new reactor model, the AP1000, but it was recently told by the N.R.C. that certification would be delayed because the company had been slow in answering the regulators’ questions.

New York Times 9th Sept 2009 more >>

GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy said on Wednesday it has submitted the revised design documents for its Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. GE Hitachi said the submission marks a milestone in the company’s effort to move forward with the 1,520-megawatt design which two U.S. utilities have selected to use for two new nuclear plants, some of the first reactors proposed after a three-decade lapse in U.S. nuclear expansion.

Yahoo 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Iran

European Union diplomats said last night that Iran had failed to meet demands for an immediate discussion on its nuclear programme after Tehran sent a fresh proposal on the issue to the world’s big powers. As expectations grow that negotiations on United Nations sanctions will now begin in New York, EU diplomats said Iran’s response to a long-standing incentives package had failed to contain any substance.

FT 10th Sept 2009 more >>

THE United States has voiced concerns Iran may already have stockpiled enough enriched uranium to build a nuclear bomb. US envoy Glyn Davies told a meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) 35-nation board in Vienna yesterday: “We have serious concerns that Iran is deliberately attempting, at a minimum, to preserve a nuclear weapons option.

Scotsman 10th Sept 2009 more >>

FT 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Telegraph 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Times 10th Sept 2009 more >>

The proposals that Iran’s Foreign Minister handed to other governments yesterday appear to be an exercise in buying more time, a skill that Tehran has honed with great success to protect its nuclear programme.

Times 10th Sept 2009 more >>

Iran handed a package of proposals to world powers on Wednesday, as it came under renewed Western pressure to swiftly engage in “meaningful” talks to resolve the dispute over its nuclear programme.

Herald 9th Sept 2009 more >>

France

Workers at EDF’s 3,600-megawatt Bugey plant voted on Tuesday to end a strike that started on Aug. 28 over salaries, a CGT union official said on Wednesday. Workers at the 900-MW nuclear reactor 4 went on strike that day when EDF stopped the reactor for refuelling and maintenance, slowing works at the plant.

Interactive Investor 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Posted: 10 September 2009

9 September 2009

Nuclear Insurance

Taxpayers could be forced to provide commercial insurance cover to the nuclear industry to safeguard plans being considered by ministers to build a fleet of new reactors in Britain. Private insurers are refusing to offer energy companies full coverage against the risk of a Chernobyl-style nuclear accident, forcing the Government to consider stepping in itself to act as an “insurer of last resort”. The Department of Energy and Climate Change confirmed that PricewaterhouseCoopers, the audit firm, had been appointed to draw up recommendations setting out how the Government could do this. Simon Hobday, a lawyer for Pinsent Masons specialising in the nuclear industry, said that the situation had arisen because of rules contained in an international agreement signed by the UK in 2004. These will force operators of nuclear power plants to broaden the type of insurance cover they have in place against the threat of a nuclear leak. New rules, which were originally due to take effect in 2006 mean insurance must cover any claim for loss of life, personal injury and damage to or loss of property for up to 30 years from the date an incident takes place (previously 10 years), and the amount of cover must increase to 700 million (£620 million – previously £140m ) per site.

Times 9th Sept 2009 more >>

New Nukes

Letter from Prof David Elliott: Nuclear Power is not the answer to climate change. Indeed it could well undermine the development of the real solutions – energy efficiency and renewable energy. And yet the Labour government has moved from a position of supporting a programme of replacing older nuclear plants to one of a radical expansion, with talk of a UK nuclear contribution of 35-40% “beyond 2030”. I cannot support these policies or views. As a lifelong Labour movement activist and long-standing Labour party member, I have struggled to live with various New Labour policies. But the new policies on nuclear will, I believe, lead to major long-term global security problems. The policies could also undermine energy security and environmental sustainability, since money, manpower and other resources will be diverted away from renewables and energy efficiency. I have made these points regularly in various forums. But the commitment to an expanded nuclear programme is deepening. I have therefore, reluctantly, decided to resign from the Labour party.

Guardian 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Hinkley

PLANS for a new nuclear power station at Hinkley Point have taken a step forward with preparatory work beginning this month. Investigative works on land at Hinkley Point and in the Severn Estuary should get underway this autumn and winter, and will help the firm prepare for submitting a planning application for a new power station. The on-shore work will include excavating around 70 archaeological trenches and carrying out borehole investigations to learn about the local geology. Offshore, survey works in the Severn Estuary will be carried out to find the best location for water cooling intake and outlet tunnels for the potential new power plant. EDF consultants are also working on plans to refurbish Combwich Wharf, to allow large equipment for the new build to be delivered via the estuary.

Bridgwater Mercury 8th Sept 2009 more >>

This is Somerset 7th Sept 2009 more >>

Nuclear Status

The International Atomic Energy Agency raised its nuclear power projections for 2030 on Tuesday, with China, India, Japan and South Korea seen embracing atomic energy more than before. The Vienna-based agency expects installed nuclear power capacity to rise by at least 40 percent worldwide over the next two decades to around 510 gigawatts. It could more than double in one scenario, the agency said. The projections were eight percent higher than last year’s estimates for 2030 and predictions for Asian countries in particular helped pull up the total.

Reuters 8th Sept 2009 more >>

FT 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Ireland – Nuclear Debate

IT’S a pity that a sensible debate on nuclear isn’t possible in Ireland. There was a proposal back in the late 1960s to build such a station but environmentalists killed off the idea. Forty years on, are we all cycling to work and heating our homes by burning garden waste? Of course not: as already noted, we’re practically gargling crude oil. But antipathy to nuclear power has become a kind of secular religion, based almost entirely on superstition and bad science. It is the sine qua non of what Lenin once called ‘infantile leftism’. Nuclear power was opposed at least partly because it seemed to imply a commitment to a nuclear military industry and thus nuclear weapons. The emergent Green movement argued that nuclear power was altogether too dangerous to be meddled with. But the truth is that the nuclear industry’s safety record is better by far than that of the fossil fuel industries.

Irish Examiner 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Decommissioning

Future nuclear decommissioning projects may rely on high-power lasers currently used to weld automotive bodies. That is the hope of welding experts at TWI, who have been awarded a contract worth almost £1m by the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority to further develop the idea.

The Engineer 8th Sept 2009 more >>

Climate

Ofgem, the energy regulator, has announced plans for a radical shake-up and growth in size as it prepares to deal with the burden of measures to tackle climate change.

Telegraph 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Tens of billions of pounds will have to be raised through flight taxes to compensate developing countries for the damage air travel does to the environment, according to the Government’s advisory body on climate change.

Times 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Guardian 9th Sept 2009 more >>

The Government is likely to be challenged by its own climate change advisory body on its decision to approve a third runway at Heathrow and permit a doubling in air travel by 2030.

Times 9th Sept 2009 more >>

The North Sea will provide Britain with a natural resource worth as much as £10 billion a year if the Government exploits it as a store for carbon dioxide (CO2 ) captured from power stations, scientists have said. Britain has more storage space for waste CO2 than all other northern European countries combined, with the exception of Norway, according to research that suggests carbon capture and storage (CCS) could be one of the boom industries of the next 20 years.

Times 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Hopes of a global deal to tackle climate change have receded after David Miliband, the Foreign Secretary, said there was a “real danger” that a UN summit in Copenhagen in December would fail to produce an effective treaty on cutting greenhouse gases. He said that the world was facing a bleak future in which climate change would cause mass migration and conflict in many regions over declining supplies of food, water and other resources. Suspicion between rich and poor countries was hampering progress towards a deal and other problems, such as the recession, were clouding the agenda.

Times 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Independent 8th Sept 2009 more >>

Nuclear Weapons

A cross-party group of ex-ministers and former generals will be launched next month to push for global nuclear disarmament. The group, chaired by a former defence secretary, Des Browne, will seek to rally European support for a US-led initiative to work towards the abolition of nuclear weapons through radical, co-ordinated cuts in the arsenals of existing nuclear states, in an effort to persuade emerging powers to forgo such weapons.

Guardian 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Backers of a global pact banning nuclear tests said on Tuesday they would seize on U.S. President Barack Obama’s disarmament initiatives to further their agenda at the United Nations this month.

Reuters 8th Sept 2009 more >>

Middle East Online 9th Sept 2009 more >>

Herald 8th Sept 2009 more >>

Iran

Iran is preparing to give a new set of proposals to the global powers involved in talks over its nuclear programme, Iranian media has reported.

BBC 8th Sept 2009 more >>

Turkey

When Vladimir Putin visited Ankara last month, one of the Russian prime minister’s main objectives was to breathe new life into Turkey’s long-held dream of developing civil nuclear power. The planned reactor at Akkuyu on Turkey’s south-east coast, conceived in the 1970s and now being developed by a Russian-Turkish consortium, is still delayed by haggling over the price. But Turkey has made clear it is firmly committed to acquiring nuclear generation capacity.

FT 9th Sept 2009 more >>

UAE

The United Arab Emirates denied on Tuesday that it was days away from awarding the largest ever energy contract in the Middle East for the development of a nuclear power plant. The denial was issued after industry sources told Reuters that the UAE was on the verge of naming a winner for the contract to build at least four reactors, which consultancy Eurasia Group estimates may cost as much as $40 billion (24 billion pounds).

Reuters 8th Sept 2009 more >>

Posted: 9 September 2009

8 September 2009

New Nukes

Many scientists and environmentalists still distrust nuclear power in any form, arguing that it can never escape its cost, safety and waste problems. What’s more, critics say, trying to solve the problems in one area, such as safety, inevitably lead to more problems in another area, such as costs. Here’s a closer look at how the industry says it’s addressing its longstanding problems and where skeptics say nuclear energy is still coming up short.

Wall Street Journal 8th September 2009 more >>

Companies

The Barrow-based James Fisher group has bought nuclear and space engineering company MB Faber Ltd, of Leyland, in a cash deal worth up to £5.25m.

NW Evening Mail 7th Sept 2009 more >>

Uranium

Chinese state-owned power producer China Guangdong Nuclear Power Holding Co. Ltd has agreed a takeover bid for Australian uranium explorer Energy Metals , the Australian company said on Tuesday.

Interactive Investor 8th September 2009 more >>

Iran

Iran’s confrontation with the international community over its nuclear programme has reached a “stalemate”, the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency said on Monday.

Telegraph 8th Sept 2009 more >>

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said yesterday that Iran will neither halt uranium enrichment nor negotiate over its nuclear rights, but is ready to sit and talk with world powers over “global challenges”.

Independent 8th Sept 2009 more >>

FT 8th Sept 2009 more >>

Times 8th Sept 2009 more >>

A new round of international sanctions against Iran looked almost inevitable today after the head of the UN’s nuclear watchdog, Mohamed ElBaradei, said talks with the Islamic republic were at a “stalemate”, and the Iranian president appeared to rule out a compromise.

Guardian 8th Sept 2009 more >>

Brazil

France’s partially state-owned electric and gas utility GDF Suez said Monday it has signed a nuclear cooperation agreement with Brazilian companies Eletrobras and Eletronuclear.

MSN Money 7th Sept 2009 more >>

Germany

German leader’s party plans to keep nuclear power stations open beyond 2020. An estimated 50,000 protesters took to the streets of Berlin at the weekend to demonstrate against plans to extend the life of nuclear power plants. According to a Greenpeace study released at the weekend, 59 percent of Germans are opposed to extending the life of the nuclear plants.

The Ecologist 7th Sept 2009 more >>

Pictures

more >>

Climate

The spectre of a 4C warmer world, with alligators basking off the coast of Sweden, a vast desert surrounding the Mediterranean and a largely uninhabitable mainland Europe, is to be presented to European Union countries by the foreign secretary, David Miliband. As part of a diplomatic push by Britain to persuade rich countries to put climate change at the top of their agendas, Miliband will address EU, French, Swedish and Danish foreign ministries in the next 48 hours. He then travels to New York where he will meet foreign ministers from other rich countries next week to hammer out details of a major treaty on global warming ahead of UN talks in Thailand, which will conclude at a crucial summit in December in Copenhagen.

Guardian 8th Sept 2009 more >>

Submarines

The Ministry of Defence has awarded a £1.2m contract to Fujitsu Technology Solutions to build the IT for the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Programme (NNPP).

V3 7th Sept 2009 more >>

Nuclear Weapons

How many are there and who has them?

Guardian 7th Sept 2009 more >>

Trident

By a margin of 58 to 35 per cent, people believe that the £25bn renewal of the Trident programme should be abandoned because of the state of the public finances. The finding will strengthen the hand of ministers who are pressing Gordon Brown to cancel or delay the scheme as Labour prepares to unveil public spending cuts.

Independent 8th Sept 2009 more >>

Posted: 8 September 2009