News July 2009

31 July 2009

NDA

The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority has awarded TWI Ltd in Cambridge a contract worth almost £1m to demonstrate the capability of lasers in decommissioning nuclear facilities. The deal will see TWI, a materials engineering specialist, set up technology demonstrations to show how modern, high power lasers can be used to remove contaminated surfaces of concrete and cut up metal pipework and process vessels.

Business Weekly 30th July 2009 more >>

Radhealth

The KiKK study Childhood Cancer in the Vicinity of Nuclear Power Plants found increased leukemias near all German nuclear facilities. The Environmental Health Sub-Committee of the West Cumbria Site Stakeholder Group raised the findings with COMARE and asked for its views. A one-page COMARE briefing was sent by Professor Alex Elliott, the COMARE chairman. The West Cumbria group sent a copy of the briefing to an independent consultant, Dr Ian Fairlie. He was concerned that the COMARE briefing generally sought to diminish the KiKK study. In his view, the briefing was unscientific in suggesting that COMARE’s lightweight ecological studies had more merit than the powerful KiKK case-control study. It was also less than transparent, as it omitted the findings of relevant epidemiology studies and gave a misleading interpretation of KiKK’s comments on confounders. Dr Fairlie wrote a letter accordingly to the editor of a UK scientific journal (which I cannot name) for publication. The editor contacted COMARE asking about the status of their briefing and was informed that the briefing did not represent COMARE’s formal position and that COMARE had not issued a formal statement on the KiKK study. This, in effect, amounted to a withdrawal of the chairman’s briefing.

Open Democracy 30th July 2009 more >>

The only realistic alternative to fossil fuels is nuclear power. It is cleaner, causing far less air pollution, and, contrary to popular opinion, safer. The Chernobyl accident caused about 4,000 premature deaths. Coal and oil don’t cause such spectacular disasters, but the work is dangerous and the constant stream of death and injury exceeds the toll of nuclear accidents.

Carlisle News and Star 30th July 2009 more >>

Hinkley

EIGHT workers at Hinkley Point nuclear power station were exposed to radiation after a corridor became contaminated last week.

This is the West Country 30th July 2009 more >>

Energy Bills

British Gas announced an 80 per cent surge in profits yesterday after steep falls in the wholesale cost of energy. At the same time Centrica, its parent, shrugged off calls for consumer price cuts, saying the cost of decarbonising Britain’s energy supplies would keep bills high for the foreseeable future.

Times 31st July 2009 more >>

Companies

Over the longer term, the group’s potential is enormous, particularly in nuclear. Rolls-Royce was a big winner from the Government’s £152m advanced manufacturing investment, launched this week, and one of the four new manufacturing sites to be built with its £45m slug will focus purely on nuclear.

Independent 31st July 2009 more >>

Sellafield

FIFTEEN workers have been axed by Studsvik at Sellafield. All the men have been working on a major project to decommission B204 – Sellafield’s original reprocessing plant. Studsvik UK’s president Sam Usher yesterday told The Whitehaven News: “Regretfully I can confirm that 15 workers are being made redundant as a result of the completion of our contract for decommissioning B204.”

Whitehaven News 29th July 2009 more >>

US

More than perhaps any other company, McKinsey has documented how an aggressive energy efficiency strategy sharply lowers the cost of climate action. Today they released their most comprehensive analysis to date of this country’s energy efficiency opportunity, “Unlocking energy efficiency in the U.S. economy.” Bottom line: If this country get serious about energy efficiency for instance, by passing a climate and clean energy bill like Waxman-Markey then we can sharply reduce existing emissions at a large net savings to the public and U.S. businesses. In fact the US can meet its entire 2020 emissions target with efficiency and cogeneration and lower its energy bill by $700bn

Climate Progress 29th July 2009 more >>

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada has achieved his long-held plan of doing away with the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste dump 90 miles northwest of Las Vegas. Following conversations with Energy Secretary Steven Chu and the White House, Senator Reid today announced that the administration and the Energy Department have agreed to cut off all funding to pursue a license application for the Yucca Mountain Project in the 2011 budget.

Environment News Service 30th July 2009 more >>

Bulgaria

Bulgaria may cancel construction of a 4 billion-euro ($5.5 billion) nuclear power station and sell shares in its state-run energy utilities to plug a widening deficit, according to Deputy Prime Minister Simeon Djankov.

Bloomberg 31st July 2009 more >>

France

French utility EDF aims for its 58 reactors to achieve an availability rate of 81 percent in 2009 and 85 percent by 2011, the firm CEO said. According to a Reuters estimate the current nuclear availability rate stood at around 70 percent by end-July.

Reuters 30th July 2009 more >>

Spain

Nuclear power production capacity resumed to normal levels in Spain, with the reconnection of two nuclear plants. The country’s eight nuclear reactors are expected to produce at full capacity until September, when nuclear plant maintenance starts again.

Argus Media 30th July 2009 more >>

Libya

Libya and Canada have signed a memorandum of intent on nuclear power, the fourth signed by Tripoli in the past two years. The memorandum foresees cooperation between the two countries in research and the mining, processing and transport of uranium, as well as its use in medicine and desalination projects.

Middle East Online 30th July 2009 more >>

India

India has launched its first indigenously built nuclear submarine, three decades after inaugurating the Advanced Technology Vessel (ATV) programme and following an 11-year construction process.

Jane’s Defence Weekly 30th July 2009 more >>

Aldermaston

The government’s Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) at Aldermaston in Berkshire is advertising for a “virtual reality specialist” to use “serious gaming” to help train nuclear weapons scientists. One of the qualifications required is experience of computer games with good graphics like Crysis, the job advert says. Crysis, marketed by the California-based company Electronic Arts, is a “first person shooter” game in which players become part of an elite group of US soldiers on a mission to an island in the South China Sea. They rapidly become embroiled in a bloody battle with North Koreans, then monsters from outer space.

Guardian 31st July 2009 more >>

CCS

It was meant to be the world’s first demonstration of a technology that could help save the planet from global warming – a project intended to capture emissions from a coal-fired power station and bury them safely underground. But the German carbon capture plan has ended with CO2 being pumped directly into the atmosphere, following local opposition at it being stored underground. The scheme appears a victim of “numbyism” – not under my backyard.

Guardian 29th July 2009 more >>

Climate Progress 29th July 2009 more >>

Renewables

Supporters of workers occupying the Vestas wind turbine factory on the Isle of Wight today broke into the premises to deliver food, accusing the company of trying to starve the men into submission.

Guardian 31st July 2009 more >>

Energy Efficiency

TENS of thousands of households are to be offered advice on how to improve the energy efficiency of their homes, under a 15 million scheme announced yesterday. Experts will knock on all doors in each of ten chosen areas of Scotland, to offer to carry out an audit of how efficiently energy is being used, and means tested free or discounted insulation will be offered. The Scottish Government funded scheme will benefit up to 96,000 homes initially, and could then be rolled out to other areas over the next few years. Green groups warned yesterday the initiative did not go far enough.

Scotsman 31st July 2009 more >>

Herald 31st July 2009 more >>

Posted: 31 July 2009

30 July 2009

NDA

UK taxpayers face a smaller bill after the organisation responsible for cleaning up Britain’s old nuclear power sites reported an income rise. The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority’s (NDA) commercial income rose £517m to £2n almost halving its government grant from £1.6 billion in 2007-2008 to £898m, according to its annual report and accounts published this month. The income improvement on the previous year is in part due to increased electricity sales from the Wylfa and Oldbury nuclear power plants. Oldbury was granted permission to keep producing power beyond its scheduled closure date late last year.

Edie 29th July 2009 more >>

Nuclear Supply Chain

The UK nuclear sector is to benefit from a multimillion pound government support package. The government has pledged £19 million for the nuclear sector in its low-carbon industrial strategy to help engineering firms develop and update manufacturing processes and technologies. It wants companies to be ready to supply components and services to the programme of nuclear new-build due to start in a few years. Around £15 million is being used to set up a Nuclear Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre. The centre, which is due to open in 2011, will house 30 industrial partners as well as leading universities in the nuclear field, and is intended to provide “a focal point for the UK supply chain’s response to the increasing global market for nuclear power”. The centre follows a similar template to existing manufacturing research centres in Sheffield and at Strathclyde University. The Manufacturing Advisory Service (MAS) will receive £4 million to expand services to the nuclear sector. The MAS will advise companies outside the nuclear sector on how they can supply to it with an emphasis on the rigorous quality assessment processes in the industry.

Professional Engineering 29th July 2009 more >>

Keenly aware that UK Engineering can be a key player in supplying the world with nuclear power equipment, the DavyMarkham management and workforce are actively promoting the Sheffield company’s highly relevant, precision heavy engineering skills and embracing the new technologies, working practices and quality systems needed to compete in this sector The firm’s participation in Unite’s New Energy conference underlines that goal and helped raise its profile in the potential nuclear supply chain.

Process and Control 29th July 2009 more >>

Nuclear Costs

There is a well-known story about how to boil a frog. If you try to throw a frog into a pot already boiling, he’ll jump out. However, put a frog into a pot and slowly raise the temperature — and you get frog legs for dinner. The nuclear power industry seems to be pursuing this strategy, slowly releasing ever higher cost estimates for new nuclear power plants. If the public does not realize the true costs of a new nuclear plant, the industry can obtain political support for the Federal loan guarantees it needs. After the taxpayers are on the hook and a nuclear project is already underway, the full costs will become clear. At that point, however, it may be too late for taxpayers and utility ratepayers to jump out.

Energy Economy Online 24th July 2009 more >>

Electricity Supplies

U.K. utilities may need to mothball power plants and cut investment plans as the country faces the biggest electricity glut in almost 20 years. National Grid Plc, the manager of Britain’s power network, predicts this year’s 6 percent drop in consumption may leave some plants unneeded to meet demand. The oversupply will increase because the country’s six biggest energy suppliers, led by Centrica Plc and Scottish & Southern Energy Plc, are developing more natural gas-fueled stations. The NDA has extended the operating life of its oldest atomic reactors, and EDF’s British Energy division got approval on July 1 to extend the use of its Hartlepool and Heysham-1 plants for another 10 years.

Bloomberg 29th July 2009 more >>

Bradwell

ANTI-nuclear protesters plan to take to the water to object to proposals for a new power station at Bradwell. The Blackwater Against New Nuclear Group is calling on sailors and fishermen to join them for the protest, on August 9. Boats will drop anchor at 2pm in the Blackwater Estuary, off the old power station, for a two-hour demonstration. There will also be gatherings at Monkey Beach, West Mersea and on the beach at Bradwell.

North Essex Gazette 29th July 2009 more >>

Wylfa

There are still “significant issues” to overcome before hundreds of jobs at Anglesey Aluminium can be saved, says Welsh Secretary Peter Hain. At the moment the plant, which is a major user of electricity, buys it cheaply from the nearby Wylfa nuclear power station but that agreement ends in a couple of months, and the plant’s future is in jeopardy.

BBC 29th July 2009 more >>

Hinkley

A NUCLEAR leak in a corridor at Hinkley Point B exposed eight contractors to radiation. On Thursday, workers were carrying out an inspection of the R3 Reactor, monitoring and replacing anything which needed renewing. In this instance, they were replacing valves in the reactor when it became contaminated, exposing all of them to low-level radiation.

This is Somerset 29th July 2009 more >>

Sellafield

RADIATION is thought to have contributed to the death of the former Sellafield worker who was jailed in 2004 for a bomb hoax at the site’s visitors centre. Duncan Ball, who worked in the Magnox plant for 20 years, died on July 17. He was 49.

Whitehaven News 29th July 2009 more >>

POWER companies have only a few more days to show their hands over the big Sellafield land auction. It follows the NDA’s decision to put “under the hammer” 400 acres of prime farmland outside the existing nuclear site to pave the way for building one or more nuclear reactors. On Monday the decommissioning authority gave a week’s notice for potential buyers to “express an interest” in acquiring the land.

Whitehaven News 29th July 2009 more >>

Ukraine

Ukraine is having trouble meeting payment schedules for Russian nuclear fuel, but suppliers say there will be no disruption.

World Nuclear News 29th July 2009 more >>

Renewables

Workers occupying a wind turbine factory on the Isle of Wight vowed to continue their protest for another week today after a legal attempt to evict them quickly failed.

Guardian 30th July 2009 more >>

FT 30th July 2009 more >>

As ministers have sounded the fanfare for hundreds of thousands of green jobs, the demise of the Vestas wind turbine plant on the Isle of Wight has provided a mocking counterpoint. The closure of one factory with the loss of 600 jobs does not in itself say much about the success or failure of the governments strategy. However, the decision by Vestas is an uncomfortable reminder that the vision of a vibrant industry growing up to meet the challenge

of cutting carbon dioxide emissions for Britain and the world is little more than an aspiration.

FT 30th July 2009 more >>

At one level that seems peculiar, as both the main parties at Westminster are firmly committed to expanding renewables rapidly. Dig deeper to the local level, however, and the picture changes. We reported yesterday on objections being lodged in Shetland to the largest windfarm in Europe, and Greenpeace figures this week show that local councils are refusing permission for windfarms more often than they are giving them the green light, particularly in Conservative districts. A government scheme to overhaul the planning rules is supposed to make it easier to override local objections, but – while in firm agreement with the direction of travel – the Tory frontbench objects to some of the detail, which it regards as undemocratic. And until further detailed regulations emerge, it is unclear to potential investors how far either party will face down the inevitable objections from local people who resent the change that wind farms bring to familiar landscapes.

Guardian 30th July 2009 more >>

Posted: 30 July 2009

29 July 2009

Nuclear Subsidy

Rolls Royce will get the biggest portion of 150 million pounds ($250 million) of U.K. government funding announced by Business Secretary Peter Mandelson. The aircraft-engine maker will use 45 million pounds of government money to build four factories in Britain, three focused on aerospace and one on civil nuclear power, the Department for Business said in a statement today from London.

Bloomberg 28th July 2009 more >>

ROLLS-ROYCE has sent out a clear signal of its intention to corner two markets which it sees as key to future growth. Greener aero engines and new nuclear power stations look to be the focus in coming years.

Business East Midlands 29th July 2009 more >>

Sellafield

It is hoped that hundreds of new nuclear engineering jobs will be created at Sellafield after the government lent its support to the safe expansion of the global nuclear energy sector. Prime minister Gordon Brown’s plans for coping with nuclear challenges places the Cumbrian processing plant in a favourable position, the North West Evening Mail reports. It is hoped that the site will benefit from a new wave of reprocessing and fuel manufacturing contracts after the UK said it would help any country looking to safeguard stocks of potentially risky nuclear material.

Career Engineer 28th July 2009 more >>

Germany

Whether nuclear power generation gets a second lease on life in Germany depends on the result of the Sept. 27 general election. In 2000, a center-left coalition between Social Democrats and Greens under then Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder agreed to gradually phase out all of the country’s 17 remaining nuclear reactors by around 2021. But a looming power supply gap means current Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Christian Democrats and the Liberal party are in favor of postponing the nuclear exit.

Wall Street Journal 28th July 2009 more >>

Iran

The issues on which the US, France, and the UK are making a hue and cry were once hatched and sponsored by them. How could one forget that it was the US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger who had signed the National Security Decision Memorandum 292 titled, ‘US-Iran Nuclear Cooperation’ in 1975, which very generously laid out the niceties of the sale of nuclear energy equipment to Iran to bring home more than $ 6 billion as revenue? This cooperation did not stop in the following year (1976) when US President Gerald Ford signed a directive offering Tehran a chance to buy and operate a US-built reprocessing facility for extracting plutonium from nuclear reactor fuel. The deal was for a complete nuclear fuel cycle. Besides this, numerous other contracts were signed with various Western firms, including a German firm that began the construction of the Bushehr power plant. Work was halted after the 1979 Iranian Revolution and the German firm withdrew from the project.

Middle East Online 28th July 2009 more >>

Jordan

Jordan is forging ahead with a peaceful nuclear programme that would turn the energy-poor kingdom into an exporter of electricity, nuclear chief Khaled Tukan said.

Middle East Online 28th July 2009 more >>

Renewables

Letter from David Lowry: Thank you for your positive article Wind farm in Westminster? about the threatened closure of Britain’s only commercial-scale wind turbine manufacturer on the Isle of Wight. This week during the end-of-session adjournment debate in the House of Commons, Labour MP Lindsay Hoyle asked: “Given that the government are expanding the UK market with more wind farms offshore and onshore, what can we do to ensure that some of that work is put into the Vestas factory on the Isle of Wight to keep this country’s manufacturing base going?”

Morning Star 29th July 2009 more >>

More than a week into their wildcat occupation of the Vestas Wind Systems plant 11 workers opened letters from the management telling them they had been sacked with immediate effect and without compensation.

Guardian 29th July 2009 more >>

Independent 29th July 2009 more >>

Telegraph 29th July 2009 more >>

Police in the Isle of Wight are bracing themselves for the possible arrival of thousands of environmental activists who are heading to the island in a show of support for workers facing the closure of the Vestas wind turbine factory.

Guardian 29th July 2009 more >>

Britain’s countryside and coastline will be dotted with 2,700 new wind turbines by 2012 more than double the existing total according to an industry survey of approved wind farms. The figures contradict claims by Vestas, owner of the country’s only significant wind turbine factory, that demand is too low to justify continuing production. The Danish company will go to court today to seek a possession order allowing it to evict 18 members of staff who have spent the past ten days barricaded inside offices at the factory at Newport in the Isle of Wight.

Times 29th July 2009 more >>

Europe’s largest onshore windfarm project has been thrown in severe doubt after the RSPB and official government agencies lodged formal objections to the 150-turbine plan. The setback adds to the problems facing the government’s ambition to install 10,000 new turbines across the UK by 2020. The proposed 550MW windfarm, sprawling across the centre of Shetland’s main island, would add almost 20% to existing onshore wind capacity. But the objectors say the plans could seriously damage breeding sites for endangered birds, including a rare wader, the whimbrel, which was unexpectedly discovered by the windfarm developer’s own environmental survey teams. Other species at risk include the red throated diver, golden plover and merlin.

Guardian 29th July 2009 more >>

Climate

China’s three biggest power firms produced more greenhouse gas emissions last year than the whole of Britain, according to a Greenpeace report published today. The group warned that inefficient plants and the country’s heavy reliance on coal are hindering efforts to tackle climate change. While China’s emissions per capita remain far below those of developed countries, the country as a whole has surpassed the United States to become the world’s largest emitter.

Guardian 29th July 2009 more >>

Slough’s reputation for industrial sprawl may soon be a thing of the past as it joins environmental capitals including Copenhagen and Vancouver in pledging to strive to be part of the UN’s Climate Neutral Network.

Telegraph 29th July 2009 more >>

Posted: 29 July 2009

28 July 2009

Nuclear Supply Chain

A significant package of measures to help UK manufacturers seize the opportunities provided by emerging technologies was launched today by Business Secretary Lord Mandelson. It includes money for the nuclear supply chain including: total of £45 million funding to Rolls-Royce, which will see four new advanced manufacturing facilities built in the UK – three in aerospace and one civil nuclear – creating and sustaining around 800 jobs.

BIS Press Release 28th July 2009 more >>

Business Secretary Lord Mandelson got the chance to learn about Sheffield’s potential for supplying safety-critical, precision-engineered components to a resurgent nuclear power industry, when he visited an energy conference organised by trade union Unite.

Sheffield Star 28th July 2009 more >>

Oldbury

Environmental group Greenpeace may pursue legal action against nuclear power company E.ON. The threats come in the wake of Greenpeace receiving information that E.ON has begun preparations to commence drilling at their site at Oldbury, Gloucestershire on August 3rd.

Electric.co.uk 27th July 2009 more >>

The government’s plans to accelerate the rollout of a new fleet of nuclear power stations are facing further difficulties after Greenpeace signaled that it could undertake a second legal action over concerns with the planning approval process. The green group confirmed that it has written to energy and climate change secretary Ed Miliband expressing concern that preparatory work being planned by E.ON at the Oldbury site in Gloucestershire could prejudice the ongoing planning processes in favour of the energy giant.

Business Green 27th July 2009 more >>

POWER station bosses in Oldbury are making plans to make sure the lights do not go out should the swine flu crisis worsen. Joe Lamonby, Oldbury Power Station’s site director, said at a meeting that swine flu was the industry’s biggest concern at the moment but that contingency plans were being put in place should large numbers of the workforce be affected by the illness.

Gloucestershire Gazette 27th July 2009 more >>

Nuclear Safety

TESTS have confirmed that a test tube which was taken into Suffolk Fire Service’s headquarters by a woman contained a radioactive substance. The woman walked into Ipswich’s Colchester Road fire station at 5pm on Friday with a sealed test tube which she said contained the dangerous chemical.

Suffolk Evening Star 27th July 2009 more >>

Sellafield

On 27 July, the NDA gave one week’s notice for the deadline for expressions of interest in land at Sellafield. It wants interested parties to return their compliant Expressions of Interest, signed Confidentiality Agreement and Data Room Rules prior to 17:00 BST on Monday 3rd August 2009.

NDA 27th July 2009 more >>

Bradwell

On Sunday, August 9, a flotilla will sail close to the Bradwell shore in protest at the proposal for a new nuclear power station. The ‘Vigil’ will begin at 2 p.m. and last for about 2 hours.

BANNG 27th July 2009 more >>

New Nukes

Some 60 countries are considering the use of nuclear power, in addition to the 30 that already do so. One of these is Chile, which commissioned Finnish experts for advice. The figures come from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which last week held a four-day workshop to develop tools to help those countries make the decision. It said that 20 of the states it is helping could have a program in place to use nuclear by 2030. It is also helping a number of regional programs.

World Nuclear News 27th July 2009 more >>

Iran

The Obama administration yesterday stepped up its drive for a diplomatic solution to the dispute over Iran’s nuclear programme, as Robert Gates, defence secretary, called on a sceptical Israeli government to give time for talks to succeed.

FT 28th July 2009 more >>

Guardian 28th July 2009 more >>

Israel has said it is still considering using military force to stop Iran getting the bomb. Defence minister Ehud Barak told his U.S. counterpart Robert Gates he would take ‘no option’ off the table in confronting Iran’s nuclear ambitions. ‘This is our position. We mean it,’ he said, standing alongside Mr Gates.

Daily Mail 28th July 2009 more >>

Times 28th July 2009 more >>

The United States is hoping that by this autumn Iran will respond to its diplomatic efforts to curb its suspected nuclear appetites, Robert Gates, the US defence secretary said on Monday.

Telegraph 27th July 2009 more >>

Iran reiterated on Monday it has no plans to build nuclear weapons, after US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton warned Tehran that any pursuit of atomic arms was futile. “We are a signatory to the Non-Proliferation Treaty and it is our right to have peaceful nuclear activities. Nuclear weapons have no place in our defence structure,” foreign ministry spokesman Hassan Ghashghavi told reporters.

Middle East Online 27th July 2009 more >>

India

India launched its first nuclear-powered submarine on 26 July, making it the sixth country in the world to use nuclear energy in marine propulsion.

World Nuclear News 27th July 2009 more >>

Pakistan warned today of a new nuclear arms race after India launched its first homegrown nuclear submarine, joining only five other countries that have developed such vessels.

Times 27th July 2009 more >>

BBC 28th July 2009 more >>

Fusion

The ITER nuclear fusion project is an unprecedented scientific collaboration involving the European Union, United States, Russia, China, Japan, Korea and India.

Reuters (Video) 27th July 2009 more >>

Submarines

The Royal Navy are checking if one of their submarines is damaged off the Western Isles. Fishermen lifting creels off Harris spotted the submarine rising out of the water off Scalpay, this afternoon (fri). She crawled along the surface and appeared head off towards a remote sea loch. What appeared to be a Nimrod reconnaissance aircraft made a number of sweeps over the vessel said observers.

Hebrides News 24th July 2009 more >>

Climate

The world faces record-breaking temperatures as the sun’s activity increases, leading the planet to heat up significantly faster than scientists had predicted for the next five years, according to a study. The hottest year on record was 1998, and the relatively cool years since have led to some global warming sceptics claiming that temperatures have levelled off or started to decline. But new research firmly rejects that argument.

Guardian 28th July 2009 more >>

Renewables

With surging demand for power and blackouts common across the continent, Africa is looking to solar, wind and geothermal technologies to meet its energy needs.

Guardian 28th July 2009 more >>

The government yesterday awarded Vestas Technology £6m but the cash will not stop the Danish turbine manufacturer from controversially shutting its Isle of Wight factory on Friday. As 25 Vestas workers continued to occupy the factory yesterday, energy secretary Ed Miliband was heckled by protesters over the closure of the renewable energy business while he was in Oxford on ministerial business.

Guardian 28th July 2009 more >>

Oil

A long-term decline in the demand for oil could undermine the huge investments in Canadian tar sands, which have been heavily opposed by environmentalists, according to a report published today. The report, by Greenpeace, will make uncomfortable reading for the companies that are investing tens of billions of pounds to exploit the hard-to-extract oil in the belief that demand and the price would climb inexorably as countries such as China and India industrialise. Citing projections from the oil producers’ cartel Opec and the International Energy Agency, as well as various oil experts, the report casts doubt on the conventional assumption that consumption and prices will begin gathering pace once the world pulls itself out of recession. It argues that alongside the cyclical fall in the oil price there are more fundamental structural changes taking place. These are driven by advances in energy efficiency and alternative energy, cleaner vehicles, government policies on climate change and concerns over energy security.

Guardian 28th July 2009 more >>

Carbon Capture

Schwarze Pumpe is a 160 metre-tall power plant near Berlin, which breathes out a steady fog of steam and carbon dioxide, making a modest but visible contribution to global warming. Yet in the shadow of that hulking facility, engineers from Vattenfall, the Swedish energy company, are testing a new technology that promises power without pollution. Known as carbon capture and storage (CCS), it involves a complex tangle of pipes, valves and filters that burn coal and lignite in such a way that the carbon-dioxide exhaust can be separated in a highly purified form. That gas can then be piped away for use in soft-drinks factories and fire extinguishers, or buried underground. The small-scale, 30-megawatt test plant has so far captured about 1,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide since it began operation last September. Vattenfall is hoping to build a much larger 400MW facility. The EU is hoping to have a dozen or so demonstration plants running by 2015 so that a variety of CCS technologies can be tested and the best made commercially available by 2020. The Zero Emissions Platform (ZEP), is a CCS advocacy group that includes companies, scientists and non-government organisations. Some NGOs such as Greenpeace, remain wary of CCS and its corporate patrons; others are now reluctant supporters. “It’s clear that the energy system as a whole has to undergo a revolution to become low-carbon or zero-carbon by 2050. We don’t think that can be done in time with only efficiency measures or renewables,” said Mark Johnston, an analyst at WWF, explaining its decision to join the ZEP.

FT 28th July 2009 more >>

Posted: 28 July 2009

27 July 2009

New Nukes

Greenpeace is threatening to take legal action against E.ON and other nuclear companies for rushing ahead with plans to build new reactors before they have got the proper consents. The move has been triggered by reports that preparatory bore holes for new reactors will start to be drilled for E.ON on 3 August at Oldbury in Gloucestershire. EDF is said to be considering similar work. A Greenpeace spokesman said its lawyers were reviewing a situation which made a mockery of a whole raft of hurdles that were meant to be overcome before the government starts official licensing in 2013.

Guardian 27th July 2009 more >>

Sir Jonathon Porritt, the government’s adviser on Sustainable Development, has delivered a damning critique of government failures on the economy, the environment and social justice. He said civil servants at the Department for Business Innovation and Skills they had consistently obstructed attempts to improve energy efficiency.

BBC 27th July 2009 more >>

Nuclear Safety

A woman sparked an alert when she went into Suffolk’s fire service headquarters with a test tube she said contained uranium oxide. Firefighters put on air-tight suits and breathing apparatus to take the tube from the woman so it could be locked away in a secure place. Experts from Sizewell nuclear power plant tested the substance and said it had a low level of radioactivity.

BBC 25th July 2009 more >>

North Korea

North Korea has said that it is open to new dialogue to defuse tensions over its nuclear weapons program in what appeared to be a call for direct talks with the United States.

Telegraph 27th July 2009 more >>

Iran

Mrs Clinton said that Iran’s pursuit of a nuclear weapon was “futile”. “What we want to do is to send a message to whoever is making these decisions that, if you’re pursuing nuclear weapons for the purpose of intimidating, of projecting your power, we are not going to let that happen,” she said.

Times 27th July 2009 more >>

Daily Mail 26th July 2009 more >>

Middle East Online 26th July 2009 more >>

India

India has launched its first nuclear-powered submarine, becoming only the sixth country in the world to do so.

BBC 26th July 2009 more >>

Renewables

The government will today demonstrate its willingness to exert influence over Royal Bank of Scotland and Lloyds Banking Group by announcing £1bn of lending to wind farm developers whose schemes have been becalmed by a lack of cash. The initiative comes as Greenpeace unveils new figures showing that local councils run by the Conservative party block more than three times as many wind farms as they approve. Labour-controlled councils meanwhile approved marginally more projects than they turned down between December 2005 and November 2008, according to the campaign group.

Guardian 27th July 2009 more >>

Posted: 27 July 2009

26 July 2009

Nuclear power goes solar

Greenpeace was invited by the Austrian authorities to hang a banner from a nuclear power station, unlikely but true. The Zwentendorf nuclear plant was never operated and has been mothballed since the 70s. Today it is to open as a solar power station: our banner simply stated: “Energy Revolution – Climate Solution.”

Greenpeace Press Release 25th July 2009 more >>

New Nukes

Porritt retains a special, venomous relationship with his old foes like the nuclear industry: “Little more than a year ago, these nuclear zealots were telling the world that any new nuclear in the UK would require zero public subsidies. Hardened anti-nuclear campaigners such as myself fell about laughing – not one kilowatt-hour of nuclear-generated electricity has ever gone on to the grid, anywhere in the world, over 40 years, without some kind of public subsidy. So why does anybody suppose that it’s going to be any different this time round? We [in the SDC] said categorically that there was no way the industry could build new stations without subsidies. Government said we were wrong, explicitly. All the energy companies, too said they did not need subsidies. Now, they are all in there asking for large amounts of public money. No one in government will now talk to us about nuclear,” he says.

Guardian 25th July 2009 more >>

Nuclear Safety

Parliamentary Questions have revealed a disturbing catalogue of fires and coolant leaks at UK nuclear installations over the last eight years – raising serious public safety and environmental concerns. Since 2001 there have been 82 fires and 83 coolant leaks recorded at nuclear installations – in the last six months alone there were six fires and three coolant leaks.

SNP Press Release 24th July 2009 more >>

Cumbria

RWEnpower has struck deals to acquire land at Braystones, near Egremont, and Kirksanton, near Millom, which have been shortlisted by the Government as potential sites for a nuclear power station. The UK arm of the company said it had completed the sales in order establish whether the sites were suitable for nuclear new build and the move did not necessarily mean the proposals would go ahead.

Whitehaven News 24th July 2009 more >>

Hinkley

Eight workers at Hinkley Point B power station in Somerset needed decontamination following a leak of radioactive material at the site.

BBC 24th July 2009 more >>

Iran

The head of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard said Saturday that Iran will strike Israel’s nuclear facilities if the Jewish state attacks Iran, a semi-official news agency reported.

CNN 26th July 2009 more >>

Posted: 26 July 2009

25 July 2009

New Nukes

Britain’s much-heralded nuclear revival will not take place or will prove “irrelevant” the Prime Minister’s outgoing official environmental adviser, Jonathan Porritt, said yesterday. Mr Porritt, who steps down as Chairman of the Government’s Sustainable Development Commission on Monday, said that years had been wasted in pursuit of the the building of new nuclear power stations. He said the Commission had worked with the Department of Trade and Industry in 2003, then headed by Patricia Hewitt, to produce an energy White Paper that concluded that “nuclear power is not necessary for a secure low-carbon efficient UK economy”. The White Paper, he added, “should have been a real gamechanger for this Government if they had actually got on and implemented it”. But civil servants in the department had hardly taken forward its proposals on saving energy and instead had “kept the nuclear flame burning” until the secretary of state changed. “The civil servants won that battle at a great cost to energy policy in the UK,” he said. “We have had years of delay on critical things that could have been done on renewable energy and energy efficiency. We had six to eight years of prevarication when we could have been getting on with it.” He said that he did not think that nuclear power would be revived “because the markets will not put up with it” and, even if it was, “it is going to be so small as not to be terribly relevant”.

Telegraph 25th July 2009 more >>

Oldbury

PRELIMINARY work for a new nuclear power station at Shepperdine is due to start next month. Hydrock, an Almondsbury-based firm, is set to begin work on land on behalf of energy giant E.ON in preparation for a new generation nuclear power station.

Gloucestshire Gazette 24th July 2009 more >>

Terror

Terrorists groups could soon use the internet to help set off a devastating nuclear attack, according to new research. The claims come in a study commissioned by the International Commission on Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament (ICNND), which suggests that under the right circumstances, terrorists could break into computer systems and launch an attack on a nuclear state – triggering a catastrophic chain of events that would have a global impact.

Guardian 25th July 2009 more >>

South Africa

South Africa is considering the construction of three nuclear power stations on its coastline despite objections from environmentalists. The country currently has Africa’s sole nuclear plant, Koeberg, near Cape Town, which began generating electricity in 1984. It is surrounded by a private game reserve and has been targeted by environmental protesters. The three new nuclear stations provisionally known as Nuclear 1, 2 and 3 would each be able to deliver twice as much electricity as Koeberg.

Guardian 25th July 2009 more >>

India

The India-U.S. civilian nuclear deal, already hit by procedural delays, may face a new hurdle: the Japanese partners of top U.S. nuclear firms may need to convince Tokyo and get approval to do business in India.

Reuters 24th July 2009 more >>

France

Capgemini France SAS, a subsidiary of the Capgemini Group, has been selected by EDF, global leader in the generation of nuclear power, to upgrade the maintenance applications of their nuclear fleet. This upgrade will lead to an improvement of its nuclear reactors performance and enable an extension of their lifetime.

Consultant News 24th July 2009 more >>

Climate

Gordon Brown does not see the environment as important and spent years as Chancellor preventing British domestic action on climate change, the Government’s chief environmental adviser says today. In a remarkably frank interview with The Independent Jonathon Porritt says that during his time at the Treasury Mr Brown did not “get” climate change and saw the environment as “middle class stuff”. Since Mr Brown became Prime Minister, Sir Jonathon thinks that the environment “is no more important to him now than it was when he was Chancellor”. He criticises the Prime Minister in particular for backing the third runway at Heathrow, which he says was a “ludicrous decision, with no serious intellectual, economic rationale”.

Independent 25th July 2009 more >>

Renewables

Ed Miliband: We are unlikely to be a centre for onshore wind production, if up and down the country, and indeed on the Isle of Wight, onshore wind

applications are consistently turned down. So we have to win a political argument that environmentally and industrially, onshore wind is part of the solution. Vestas are keeping a protoype plant and we are considering an application from them for government help to test and develop offshore wind-blades in a factory employing 150 people on the Isle of Wight initially and potentially more later.

Independent 25th July 2009 more >>

On a grass mound outside the HQ of wind turbine maker Vestas Wind Systems, which is set to shut down with the loss of up to 600 jobs, a new kind of industrial dispute has taken shape. About 25 workers have occupied the plant in an attempt to prevent the closure, scheduled for 31 July, supported by a unique “red and green” coalition.

Guardian 25th July 2009 more >>

Coal

A major project was yesterday launched in Renfrew aimed at making green energy a reality. The project will demonstrate Doosan Babcock’s OxyCoal clean combustion system that will be suitable for installation in new or existing power plants.

Herald 25th July 2009 more >>

Posted: 25 July 2009

24 July 2009

Cumbria

ENERGY giant RWEnpower has gone ahead with its plans to buy the farmland earmarked for building nuclear reactors at Braystones and Kirksanton.

Whitehaven News 22nd July 2009 more >>

Hinkley

French energy giant EDF, which wants to build two new nuclear reactors at Hinkley Point, looks likely to pay Somerset councils a fee for their part in the planning process, saving taxpayers thousands of pounds. The three Somerset councils, which will have to advise on the local impact if a planning application is put forward and deal with complex preparatory work before an application is made, are having to ask the company to pay because the Government is refusing to reimburse them for the extra expertise they will need.

This is Somerset 22nd July 2009 more >>

HINKLEY Point B has admitted today that seven workers have been exposed to radiation, The Mercury can reveal. The firm which runs the nuclear power plant near Bridgwater says the contractors were asked to leave the radiation controlled area as a precaution after the incident last week. A spokesman for EDF Energy told the Mercury the workers were sent to a testing facility in Oxfordshire and were found to have been exposed to the same amount of radiation emitted in a dental X-ray.

This is the West Country 23rd July 2009 more >>

Bridgwater Mercury 23rd July 2009 more >>

Oldbury

Construction services group Hydrock has been appointed by E On to carry out the preliminary ground investigation for the proposed new nuclear power station at Oldbury, in Gloucestershire. From 3 August the contractor will spend two months drilling 22 boreholes at the site, acquired by the energy giant in April.

Construction News 23rd July 2009 more >>

Sizewell

BRITAIN’S safety watchdog has admitted that its preliminary report into a serious incident at the Sizewell A nuclear power station contained “pessimistic assumptions” and was misleading. The report – written less than a month after 40,000 gallons of “radioactive water” leaked from a burst pipe and obtained a few weeks ago following a Freedom of Information request by nuclear consultant John Large – suggested that the incident could have led to an off-site release of radioactivity. It formed the basis of a claim from Dr Large that Suffolk had been only ten hours away from a major accident involving the evacuation of thousands of people.

Suffolk Evening Star 23rd July 2009 more >>

Nuclear Costs

The figures that are widely quoted for the cost of nuclear electricity come from the industry itself and are far too low. They are repeated, without critical scrutiny, by such bodies as the International Energy Agency and the UK’s Royal Academy of Engineering. This makes them appear to be reliable, contrary to fact. There is an accumulation of evidence that nuclear power is substantially more expensive than it is presented by the industry, especially when environmental and hidden costs are factored in. Relevant evidence, with links to several sources.

From Greenhouse to Green House July 2009 more >>

Scotland

Letter from Colin McInnes: If we choose a long-term energy path which delivers a greener Scotland powered by wind turbines, but ultimately expensive energy, Scotland will be at a competitive disadvantage. If we accept nuclear power is the most effective way to displace coal from energy production then perhaps we can have a balanced energy programme which is not driven by ideology.

Scotsman 24th July 2009 more >>

Sellafield MoX Plant

THE future of Sellafield’s controversial under-achieving Mox plant which support around 1,000 jobs on the site is still on the line. The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority says in its annual report out this week that “on a less positive note the performance of the Sellafield mixed oxide plant (SMP) remains under close scrutiny by the NDA Board.

Whitehaven News 22nd July 2009 more >>

Sellafield

Talented poet and former nuclear foreman Duncan Ball died on July 17th aged 49. He was a man who tried repeatedly to blow the whistle on unsafe practices in the Magnox plant at Sellafield where he was employed as a foreman. His subsequent experience followed the same route as the dissident scientists who were sacked from Sellafield after expressing doubts about nuclearsafety in the 70’s.

Indy Media 23rd July 2009 more >>

Nuclear Skills

The National Skills Academy for Nuclear in partnership with the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) is rolling out a third round of their Bursary award scheme.

Politics.co.uk 23rd July 2009 more >>

A total of 80 nuclear engineering jobs are being created in the Birchwood area of Warrington after Rolls-Royce announced the opening of its new technical office. President of Rolls-Royce Nuclear Lawrie Haynes explained that the office was necessary as the company looks to expand its activities in the nuclear sector.

Career Engineer 23rd July 2009 more >>

Fuel Poverty

A flagship scheme to help poor households improve their fuel efficiency is condemned by MPs today for failing to target those most in need. Warm Front was set up in 2000 to offer grants of up to 6,000 for improvements to central heating and insulation. By next year it will have paid out 1.8bn to about 1.8m families. But the scheme is poorly targeted and remains available to only 35 per cent of all households in “fuel poverty” – defined as the millions of

those spending 10 per cent of income on fuel – according to the House of Commons public accounts committee.

FT 24th July 2009 more >>

Renewables

A unique “red and green” army of trade union and environmental campaigners was on the march in an attempt to save from closure Britain’s only major wind turbine manufacturing plant. Up to 500 people are expected outside the Vestas plant at Newport on the Isle of Wight tomorrow night where 25 workers are engaged in a sit-in, while further demonstrations are being planned simultaneously outside the Department of Energy and Climate Change in London. Greenpeace said the Vestas dispute promised a historic change from a situation where the labour movement and environment activists have found themselves on different sides of the fence, with one wanting to shut down polluting industries and the other defending jobs.

Guardian 24th July 2009 more >>

Pakistan

A proposed partnership between France and Pakistan on civilian nuclear energy will be limited to nuclear safety and security, a senior French official said on Thursday. Pakistani Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi said in May that France had agreed to transfer civilian nuclear technology to Pakistan, giving it a deal similar to the one its rival India had obtained from the United States. Such a move would cause concern in the international community. A Pakistani scientist was at the centre of the world’s biggest nuclear proliferation scandal in 2004, and fears remain that sensitive technology could leak out again.

Yahoo 23rd July 2009 more >>

Australia

Ziggy Switkowski, chairman of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, said that current Australian political opposition to nuclear power is expected to change in few years, as it is the only option to counter climate change. Switkowski said that Australians are now beginning to realize that nuclear power is needed to reduce reliance on burning coal and oil.

Energy Business Review 22nd July 2009 more >>

Brazil

Israel and Brazil sparred Wednesday over nuclear ambitions in the Middle East, especially Iran’s atomic development program, during a visit by extremist Israeli Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman.

Middle East Online 23rd July 2009 more >>

Posted: 24 July 2009

23 July 2009

Nuclear Finance

The Low Carbon Plan announcements last week revealed how some of the £405M earmarked for green industries in the Budget will be spent: £120M for developing the UK offshore wind industry; £95M for the Wave Hub demonstration and testing facility off the Cornish coast; £22M for the renewable energy proving fund; £15M for a Nuclear Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre; £10M for renewables testing facilities in Northumberland; £10M for more electric vehicle battery charging infrastructure; £8M for a marine renewables development centre in Orkney; £6M to explore geothermal potential in the south west. Leaving £119 still to be allocated.

New Civil Engineer 22nd July 2009 more >>

Nuclear Skills

Areva, EnBW, Urenco, NOK, Vattenfall and E.ON have decided to set up a ‘European Nuclear Energy Leadership Academy’ to provide theoretical and practical-based nuclear management education. The aim of the academy is to train post-graduates and high potential employees with different backgrounds to become leaders in European nuclear corporations and institutions, Urenco said in a statement on 21 July.

Nuclear Engineering International 22nd July 2009 more >>

Hinkley

ANTI-NUCLEAR campaigners claim a proposed financial deal between local councils and the firm behind plans for a new power station at Hinkley Point would be a ‘conflict of interest’. Somerset County Council, Sedgemoor District Council and West Somerset Council last week announced they are considering asking EDF Energy to fund the planning process for two new reactors at Hinkley under a Planning Performance Agreement. The councils say the move is necessary because the planning application will be so complex and will require experts in so many fields, and because repeated requests for Government funding have failed.

This is the West Country 22nd July 2009 more >>

Wylfa

THE owners of a closure threatened aluminium smelter will today continue discussing an UK Government rescue deal worth almost £50m. Hundreds of jobs will be lost if no deal is agreed to secure the future of the Anglesey Aluminium plant. The factory buys cheap electricity from Wylfa nuclear power station: this deal ends in September when the plant is due to close.

Daily Post 22nd July 2009 more >>

AS we ponder the future of Wylfa nuclear power station the CBI has recently laid out a blueprint for a secure energy future. The dangers of climate change require government to take urgent action to shift the direction of UK energy policy to achieve energy security and a low-carbon future.

Western Mail 22nd July 2009 more >>

People

Barbara Judge has chaired the UK Atomic Energy Authority – for the past five years. The state-owned body vested with dismantling our ageing nuclear plants and, since 2006, providing expertise on building new ones. Sitting in the bland offices of a Mayfair private equity firm (she’s not a director, surprisingly, just a friend of the owner) the nuclear chief is hotly vocal even slightly offended at the state of the UK nuclear industry. When she came over here in 1993, she points out, ‘more than 20 per cent of our energy was delivered by nuclear power. But if we keep decommissioning, then by 2020 just 2 per cent of our power will be delivered by nuclear. And no one’s told me that we will need 18 per cent less power by then.’

Spectator 22nd July 2009 more >>

Companies

IBERDROLA hailed the success of its acquisition of ScottishPower as growth in UK earnings helped compensate for the effects of the sharp slowdown in the economy of its home market in Spain in the first half. The company has been increasing its renewable energy generation capacity in the UK. It has signed an agreement with GDF Suez and Scottish & Southern Energy to compete for a new nuclear build programme in the UK.

Herald 23rd July 2009 more >>

Iran

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has sketched out how the United States might cope with a nuclear Iran – by arming its allies in the Gulf and extending a “defence umbrella” over the region. Her comments drew an immediate rebuke from a senior Israeli official, who said the US should focus on preventing Iran from going nuclear rather than talking as if this may be a fait accompli.

Herald 23rd July 2009 more >>

Guardian 23rd July 2009 more >>

Times 23rd July 2009 more >>

Iran and North Korea will face severe consequences if they do not abandon their nuclear ambitions, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has warned.

BBC 22nd July 2009 more >>

US

The US town of Hanford, in Washington state, is opening up its nuclear secrets to tourists.

BBC 22nd July 2009 more >>

Renewables

About 25 wind turbine workers have occupied their plant on the Isle of Wight – the Vestas Wind Systems factory in Newport – in protest at its imminent closure.

Guardian 22nd July 2009 more >>

The Government was facing a growing credibility gap over green jobs last night as environmental campaigners and trade unionists united to fight the closure of Britain’s sole major wind turbine plant.

Independent 23rd July 2009 more >>

Times 23rd July 2009 more >>

Coal

The biggest single producer of carbon emissions in the European Union has been named – and it is about to get even bigger. The appropriately titled Elektrownia Belchatow – a massive coal-fired power station – belched out 30,862,792 tonnes of CO2 last year and by 2010 the whole generating facility will have grown by 20%. Sandbag said the expansion of Belchatow and the planned construction of 50 coal-fired plants across the European mainland demonstrated that policies such as the EU’s European Trading Scheme (ETS) were not working.

Guadian 23rd July 2009 more >>

Energy Saving

Britons could save 30% of the carbon emissions associated with heating water at home by following simple advice such as lagging pipes and using low-flow taps, according to energy experts. They estimate that installing just a few water-saving measures could save a typical household 225 per year on combined water and energy bills. In a joint report launched today, the Energy Saving Trust (EST) and the Environment Agency examined the carbon impact of domestic water use in the UK. They concluded that heating water would continue to be a major source of carbon emissions from homes in the future unless urgent action was taken to reduce demand and the associated energy losses from inefficient boilers.

Guardian 23rd July 2009 more >>

Posted: 23 July 2009

22 July 2009

NDA

The man in charge of cleaning up Sellafield was paid more than £500,000 last year – for just nine months work. Dr Ian Roxburgh, who stood down as chief executive of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) in December 2008, received £540,593 in salary, bonuses and redundancy payments.

Business Gazette 21st July 2009 more >>

Oldbury

Hydrock Group Ltd has been awarded the preliminary ground investigation contract by E.ON AG for the proposed new nuclear power station at Oldbury in Gloucestershire. Work is due to start on 3 August 2009 and will involve the drilling of some 22 boreholes between 40-meters and 80-meters deep as well as down-hole geophysics and geotechnical testing.

Nuclear Engineering International 21st July 2009 more >>

New Nukes

Paul Golby: The framework set out by the Government in last week’s White Paper and previous policy announcements is designed to enable energy companies to build 12 new nuclear power stations, four new coal-fired power stations with carbon capture and storage and 26GW of offshore wind. We will be looking to fit “smart meters” and domestic heat-management systems; we will supply solar thermal panels where they are appropriate and are looking at the options for air or ground source heat pumps, which take heat from the air and the earth respectively to provide hot water. Soon such equipment will become commonplace, not just the preserve of the enlightened green consumer

Times 21st July 2009 more >>

Renewables

Radiation Free Lakeland has sent a message of support to the workers occupying the Vestas Wind Turbine plant.

Get Noticed Online 21st July 2009 more >>

The government’s green credentials were called into question today by workers staging a sit-in at a wind turbine factory that is due to close this month. Around 30 workers facing redundancy took over the management suite at the Vestas factory on the Isle of Wight. Police reinforcements were brought in but workers claimed they would not leave until the government stepped in to save the factory and more than 500 jobs. One of those barricaded in with sleeping bags and enough food to last days, gave his name as Michael. He argued that it was “crazy” for environment secretary Ed Miliband to be making “statement after statement” about green energy but standing by as the factory closed down. “It would be a tiny step financially to keep this factory open, but it would be a huge statement about the government’s commitment to the green economy,” he said.

Guardian 22nd July 2009 more >>

Times 22nd July 2009 more >>

Myanmar

The United States is concerned about the possible transfer of nuclear technology from North Korea to military-ruled Myanmar.

Reuters 22nd July 2009 more >>

Telegraph 22nd July 2009 more >>

Guardian 22nd July 2009 more >>

France

French state-owned utility EDF is expected to start publishing real-time output data per unit of production before the end of the year, several sources close to the matter told Reuters on Tuesday. EDF operates France’s 58 nuclear reactors, which meet around 80 percent of the country’s electricity demand.

Yahoo 21st July 2009 more >>

Posted: 22 July 2009