Uranium

Activists in Niger urged President Mahamadou Issoufou to negotiate with Areva SA after the French company said it will cut 200 jobs at one of its uranium mines in the West African nation to adjust to lower prices for the nuclear fuel. “It’s absolutely untrue that the only solution is to lay off staff,” said Al-Moustapha Alhacen, head of Aghirin’man, a non-governmental organization in the northern Nigerien desert town of Arlit, about 1,200 kilometers (745 miles) from the capital, Niamey. “Areva must accept to negotiate.”

Bloomberg 17th Oct 2017 read more »

Posted: 19 October 2017

Chernobyl

A Valleys manufacturing firm is playing a crucial role in the long-term operation to make safe the site of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. Pontypool-based Flamgard Calidair has developed innovative fire and shut off dampers to the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement, a €1.5bn multinational engineering project which is due to be installed before Christmas.

Wales Online 18th Oct 2017 read more »

Posted: 19 October 2017

Chernobyl

A manufacturer from Torfaen is helping to dismantle the remains of the Chernobyl nuclear power station. A concrete and steel arch will cover the reactor which was destroyed in the 1986 disaster. Pontypool-based manufacturer Flamgard Calidair has developed fire and shut off dampers for the project, known as the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement. The £1.3bn (€1.5bn) building is set to be completed before Christmas 2017.

BBC 17th Oct 2017 read more »

Posted: 18 October 2017

Chernobyl

Fears are growing in Sweden over packs of radioactive wild boar moving north across the country. One animal shot by hunters was found to have more than 10 times the safe level of radiation. The high radiation levels — which come 31 years after the Chernobyl disaster sent a cloud of radioactive dust over Sweden — have left hunters afraid to kill and eat the animals. Ulf Frykman, who works for the environmental consultancy Calluna, this week issued an alert to local hunters in the country of Gävle, about 100 miles north of Stockholm, warning them of “extremely high” radiation levels among local boar.

Telegraph 6th October 2017 read more »

Posted: 17 October 2017

Nuclear Safety

[Machine translation] The safety of nuclear power plants around the world is worrying overall even if there is no immediate concern, said the president of the French nuclear gendarme (ASN) on Monday, citing the rise of a “systemic risk”. “There are more safety issues, more industrial issues, and on the other side companies that have economic, budgetary and financial difficulties. This gap between more things to manage and fewer means to do so, over time, carries risks per se, “explained Pierre-Franck Chevet during a debate on BFM Business. The President of the Nuclear Safety Authority has described as “unprecedented challenges” the reinforcement of safety in the day-to-day operation of the nuclear power plant, the extension of the life of the power stations (originally designed to operate 40 years) or the investments still to be made at the Japanese Fukushima plant. “My main long-term message is that the situation is of global security concern,” he said. “There is a risk, not immediate at all, for safety, but a systemic risk, and we have to deal with it.”

Boursier 17th Oct 2017 read more »

Posted: 17 October 2017

NDA

Decommissioning Britain’s first generation of atomic reactors is likely to be brought back “in-house” by the UK nuclear clean-up agency after the collapse of a £6.2bn outsourcing contract that exposed “fundamental failures” at the organisation. Ministers have been considering whether the work, involving 12 Magnox nuclear plants and research sites, should be offered to another private contractor or run directly by the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority. A final decision has not yet been made but industry figures with knowledge of the process said the most likely outcome was for the NDA to create a new subsidiary to take control of the Magnox clean-up programme. Such an outcome would bring an end to an embarrassing episode in which Greg Clark, business secretary, in March cancelled a deal with Cavendish Fluor Partnership, a joint venture between UK-based Babcock International and Fluor of the US, at a cost of £122m to British taxpayers.

FT 15th Oct 2017 read more »

Posted: 16 October 2017

Nuclear Safety

Nuclear regulators who are failing to do their jobs need to take notice of Japan. Just because in most countries the nuclear industry has limitations on civil liability for nuclear disasters doesn’t mean that there won’t be criminal liability, especially for the government regulators who fail to do their jobs. Plenty of evidence for criminal liability based on willful criminal negligence can be found in our blog, alone. And, for lack of time, our blog hasn’t even touched on so many of their crimes. In particular, US NRC Commissioners Svinicki and Burns can expect to be held criminally liable for blocking NRC staff from keeping the public safer.

Mining Awareness 14th Oct 2017 read more »

Posted: 15 October 2017

Radhealth

Chris Busby: This last year, 2017 has seen increasing pressure on the radiation protection apparatus of European countries which is now clearly imploding. This pressure is a consequence of the publication in the peer-review literature of scientific studies showing sharp and statistically significant increases in congenital malformations and genetic damage in children born after Chernobyl.

Counter Punch 2nd Oct 2017 read more »

Posted: 15 October 2017

Nuclear Power Stations

Strikes at Scottish nuclear plants could lead to power shortages over Christmas, a union has warned. GMB has threatened industrial action at Hunterston B and Torness, which it says could leave Scotland without a third of its electricity supply. Union members are locked in a dispute with EDF Energy over pay and contracts. Contingencies would likely be put in place to keep the electricity grid running if strikes were to go ahead over Christmas. GMB says it has informed the Scottish Government about the implications of industrial action at the two sites, which employ a total of 1500 workers.

STV 12th Oct 2017 read more »

East Lothian Courier 12th Oct 2017 read more »

Posted: 14 October 2017

Nuclear Power Stations

Union GMB Scotland has warned that industrial action at both of Scotland’s nuclear power stations could leave the country without a third of its electricity supply this Christmas. The stark threat comes as a dispute over cuts to staff terms and conditions intensifies. The biggest trade union in the UK nuclear industry is set to launch a nationwide consultative ballot after EDF Energy announced it will cut a long-standing agreement covering pay, terms and conditions during statutory outage periods. The ballot will include Scotland’s Hunterston B and Torness stations, which employs a total of 1,500 workers, producing 35 per cent of Scotland’s total electricity generation capable of delivering power to 3.7 million homes.

Energy Voice 13th Oct 2017 read more »

Herald 13th Oct 2017 read more »

Posted: 13 October 2017