Sellafield

Bosses at the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant are turning the screw on the workforce, as they have banned workplace meetings to discuss the current pay dispute, Unite, the country’s largest union, said. The union, which is preparing to ballot its 2,000 members for industrial action ballot over a ‘completely unacceptable’ 1.5 per cent pay offer, said that the management’s action showed that it was ‘slavishly kowtowing’ to the government’s harsh polices on pay restraint. Unite also disputed the claim by Sellafield Ltd – a Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) company – that it was imposing the pay offer next month as ‘the majority’ of the nearly 11,000 workforce were in favour . Unite said that its own calculation of the figures of the three unions balloted – Prospect and the GMB are the other two – known acceptances of the offer came in at just 18 per cent.

Cumbria Crack 17th Aug 2017 read more »

The dispute at the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant in Cumbria has escalated amid claims workplace meetings to discuss a 1.5% have been banned by bosses. The union Unite, which is preparing to ballot its 2,000 members for industrial over the offer which it says is “completely unacceptable”, has hit out at the management move.

Business Desk 18th Aug 2017 read more »

Morning Star 18th Aug 2017 read more »

Posted: 18 August 2017

Radwaste

Prof Andrew Blowers, in the first of a series of articles for the Town and Country Planning Association Journal on the local and social legacies of nuclear energy, looks at where and why these legacies have come to pass. The nuclear industry has left its visible and invisible footprint in landscapes of risk encountered in the 31 countries in which nuclear energy has been developed. In several countries the mark is, as yet, small, related to one or two operating nuclear reactors. At the other extreme there are those countries with long-established nuclear industries, some involved in both the civil and military sectors, where nuclear operations, including electricity generation, reprocessing and experimental processes, are intermixed with redundant facilities, nuclear wastes, and radioactive discharges onto land and into water and emissions into the atmosphere.

No2 Nuclear Power 18th Aug 2017 read more »

Posted: 18 August 2017

Sellafield

A joint venture involving Amec Foster Wheeler and Interserve has landed a four-year maintenance contract worth up to £160 million at the Sellafield nuclear site in Cumbria. One Aim will provide engineering and support services at Sellafield, where nuclear waste is reprocessed, decommissioned and managed. Both companies have extensive experience of the nuclear sector. Amec Foster Wheeler already has several contracts for Sellafield, including a ten-year deal to provide analysis of nuclear waste. Interserve has worked for Sellafield for 17 years, including opening a new facility on the site for processing nuclear waste materials.

Times 17th Aug 2017 read more »

Herald 17th Aug 2017 read more »

City AM 16th Aug 2017 read more »

Posted: 17 August 2017

Low Level Waste

Controls on low-level nuclear waste disposal relaxed. Restrictions and liability cover requirements for low-level nuclear waste disposal and for transport of nuclear materials are to be eased.

ENDS 15th Aug 2017 read more »

Posted: 17 August 2017

Radwaste

Prof Andrew Blowers: In the first of a series of articles on the local and social legacies of nuclear energy, Andrew Blowers looks at where and why these legacies have come to pass. The nuclear industry has left its visible and invisible footprint in landscapes of risk encountered in the 31 countries in which nuclear energy has been developed. In several countries the mark is, as yet, small, related to one or two operating nuclear reactors. At the other extreme there are those countries with long-established nuclear industries, some involved in both the civil and military sectors, where nuclear operations, including electricity generation, reprocessing and experimental processes, are intermixed with redundant facilities, nuclear wastes, and radioactive discharges onto land and into water and emissions into the atmosphere.

Town & Country Planning Association (accessed) 17th Aug 2017 read more »

Posted: 17 August 2017

Radioactive Discharges

Radioactive iodine from nuclear reprocessing plants in the UK and France has been detected deep in the waters near Bermuda. Scientists say the contaminants take a circuitous route travelling via the Arctic Ocean and down past Greenland. Researchers believe the radioactivity levels are extremely low and present no danger. However, scientists can use the iodine to accurately map the currents that transport greenhouse gases. One scientific consequence that arose from the testing of nuclear bombs in the atmosphere in the 1950s was that their radioactive fallout provided a powerful global tracer of water circulation and deep-ocean ventilation. Other sources of radioactive material for scientists to track water movements have been the nuclear reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the UK and at La Hague i n France. Contaminants have been legally released from these sites for more than 50 years. One in particular, Iodine-129 (129I), has been very useful for scientists tracing the ocean currents that help pull down greenhouse gases into the waters.

BBC 17th Aug 2017 read more »

Posted: 17 August 2017

Sellafield

Amec Foster Wheeler has won a £160million deal for the Sellafield nuclear site in Cumbria. The firms will manage the engineering support services for asset care and maintenance for the site over the next four years.

Energy Voice 16th Aug 2017 read more »

Business Desk 16th Aug 2017 read more »

Posted: 16 August 2017

Dounreay

A £7million contract to demolish Scotland’s oldest nuclear reactor is out for tender. The weekend marked the 60th anniversary of the first criticality achieved in Scotland using a test rig at Dounreay in Caithness – a nuclear term referring to the balance of neutrons in the system. Now the decommissioning team responsible for the site is marking that milestone by demolishing the oldest reactor that remains at the former fast reactor research centre. Companies are being invited to bid for a contract to demolish the Dounreay Materials Test Reactor (DMTR) which became Scotland’s first operational reactor in 1958.

Energy Voice 15th Aug 2017 read more »

Posted: 15 August 2017

Sellafield

Thousands of workers at the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant are voting on whether to take industrial action. The Unite and GMB unions, which together represent half of the waste facility’s 10,000 staff, have described a pay offer of 1.5% as “completely unacceptable”. Sellafield Ltd said the award was “fair, reasonable, and affordable”, and had been accepted by another union. The ballot has now opened and the result will be announced in September.

BBC 14th Aug 2017 read more »

Politics Home 14th Aug 2017 read more »

Posted: 15 August 2017

Sellafield

Up to 5,000 workers at the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing site in Cumbria are being balloted over strike action in support of higher pay. The union for nuclear workers, GMB, has organised the vote for its 3,000 members at the facility after it said the company ignored repeated requests for further talks and is set to impose a below-inflation pay offer of 1.5%. The strike ballot begins today (Monday, August 14) and will close on Monday, September 4 2017.

Business Desk 14th Aug 2017 read more »

Posted: 14 August 2017