Bradwell

HE is the man in charge of a project so divisive, it has seen years of campaigns against it – and they show no sign of abating. So you might be interested to know Alan Raymant, the new chief executive of Bradwell B power station, not only grew up being able to see the now decommissioned Bradwell A power station from his home but frequently sailed in waters nearby. The site of the new power station, Bradwell B, lies to the east of the former station which ceased operating in 2002. The organisations behind the new project – China General Nuclear Power Group and EDF Energy – say it will bring reliable, low carbon energy for years to come as well as generating jobs, skills and investment. But anti-nuclear protesters, especially those living in Mersea and Brightlingsea, will take some convincing the good outweighs the bad. Mr Rayment grew up in Brightlingsea but says taking on the role of the proposed power station’s boss was a career choice not a nostalgic one.

Essex Gazette 16th March 2019 read more »

Posted: 17 March 2019

Wylfa

The UK government will continue talks with the company behind plans for a new nuclear power station in Anglesey, Theresa May has said. The prime minister told MPs that ministers will “support” discussions with Hitachi. Last month the company announced it would suspend work on the £13bn Wylfa Newydd project because of rising costs. The government said at the time it had failed to agree terms with Hitachi.

Wilcox Guardian 14th March 2019 read more »

Give Anglesey £40 million to soften Wylfa Newydd blow. The island’s council leaders are appealing to the Welsh & UK governments to provide the cash boost after the nuclear power plant plans were put on hold.

Daily Post 15th March 2019 read more »

Posted: 16 March 2019

Hinkley

Last month EDF Energy welcomed BBC Radio 5 Live to Hinkley Point B nuclear power station and to the construction site for Hinkley Point C for a special series of programmes interviewing people connected to the nuclear industry. Over the last few weeks, the radio station has been broadcasting a range of programmes that explore existing and future nuclear generation, renewables operations and the future of low-carbon generation, such as battery storage and electric vehicles.

Webwire 15th March 2019 read more »

Posted: 16 March 2019

Wylfa

Renewable energy plan tabled to replace canned Wylfa nuclear plant. A Welsh think tank – The Institute of Welsh Affairs (IWA) – has put forward an ambitious plan to run the country solely on renewable energy.

New Civil Engineer 15th March 2019 read more »

Posted: 15 March 2019

Sizewell

I’m beginning to think we’re living in an age of uncertainty today that is manifesting itself on a local, national, European and even a global level. And while I’m not sure it will result in anything as dramatic as the toppling of the French monarchy or the re-drawing of the world’s maps, I really don’t know where things will end. The future of Suffolk rests on a precipice. Last week I wrote about the possibility of a new town, or towns, being built to the north of Ipswich to satisfy the demand for a northern by-pass. There is also the threat of Sizewell C and the onshore infrastructure needed for offshore wind industry to the entire heritage coast area between Aldeburgh and Lowestoft. I was pleased to see the concerns expressed by Suffolk County Council’s cabinet over these threats at its meeting this week – but the truth is that local voices don’t really matter to EDF or the government. They are looking at the national picture and if that means destroying some of the most important natural environments in Suffolk then so be it. While I have great sympathy for the protest groups trying to fight these plans, and for the views expressed by the county council, I have to say they won’t sway any minds in the London or Paris offices where the decisions will be taken. However, I still retain the hope and belief that the economics of the old technology of nuclear power will ultimately persuade EDF it simply isn’t worth pursuing the Sizewell nightmare. And I do hope that the firms planning to bring green renewable power onshore from the North Sea windfarms will be prepared to show that the environment of the people of east Suffolk is as important to them as the general environment that their power plants help to advance.

East Anglian Daily Times 14th March 2019 read more »

Posted: 15 March 2019

Nuclear Finance

This consultation is part of the government’s review of infrastructure finance. The review will look at the government’s tools for supporting private investment, and how they are delivered, in the context of the UK’s changing relationship with the European Investment Bank. The government is committed to ensuring high levels of private investment continue to flow into UK projects, to help build infrastructure fit for the 21st century. All interested parties are invited to respond by 5 June 2019. Responses are welcomed by post or by email.

Treasury 13th March 2019 read more »

Posted: 15 March 2019

Sizewell

NFLA submits its views on Sizewell C proposed new nuclear reactor – new nuclear is not needed as renewable and related energy alternatives are cheaper, easier to realise, waste free and scalable.

NFLA 13th March 2019 read more »

Posted: 14 March 2019

Wylfa

A PARK and ride area, aimed towards car sharing commuters, has been rubber stamped by Anglesey Council planners. The plans, submitted by the authority, will include enough spaces for 116 cars and set up near junction 7 of the A55’s eastbound carriageway, near the Menai Science Park in Gaerwen. The approved plans also include cycle storage, six electrical charging facilities and a bus stop, which is hoped will encourage motorists to lift share. According to the planning documents, it had been envisaged it would be used by Wylfa Newydd construction workers but with the fate of that project currently in the air, officers told this afternoon’s planning committee meeting that it would be available for general commuters.

North Wales Chronicle 12th March 2019 read more »

Posted: 14 March 2019

Nuclear Finance

While Philip Hammond was busy offering a few marginal measures for green energy he is busy planning to give nuclear power a massive multibillion state funded boost. Clothed in talk of a new means financing infrastructure projects is a silkily wrapped poison pill involving a massive public handout to nuclear power. Heralded as a key accompaniment to today’s Spring Budget statement there is a misleading message that the Government is to adopt so-called ‘Regulated Asset Base’ (RAB) financing of nuclear power projects. This is said to be a successor vehicle to the much-abused PFI system. But if deployed to aid nuclear power the result, is likely to be much much worse than any horrors that have come from even PFI. In fact the notion of RAB financing is being grotesquely distorted to hide the fact that this is a cover for the Government risking very large sums of money to be lent to nuclear power developers. Put simply, if the nuclear power projects are as expensive as they usually are the electricity consumer will lose an awful lot of money and prices will be jerked upwards. Either that or the taxpayer takes a hit and funding of public services suffer big time. You can see the cover up reproduced in the impression given by the Government to the Financial Times today where, we are told that ‘For new nuclear power stations, for example, the government is keen on the use of “RAB” (regulated asset base) financing of the sort used to build the Thames Tideway tunnel’ Under such schemes the developers are allowed to charge consumers in advance for the capital building projects. What Ministers are not emphasising of course, is that in industries such as water the Government does not lend lots of money to the privatised companies. They raise this on private markets. But in the case of nuclear power plants the bulk of the money needed to build them will be borrowed from the Government.

Dave Toke’s Blog 13th March 2019 read more »

Posted: 14 March 2019

Sizewell

A 1,500-strong petition opposing plans for a new nuclear plant has been delivered to a county council leader. EDF Energy hopes to build the £16bn Sizewell C on the Suffolk coast, next to the existing Sizewell B. The petition was handed to Suffolk County Council’s Conservative leader Matthew Hicks ahead of the authority’s cabinet meeting. Campaign group Together Against Sizewell C (TASC) said the case against the development was “overwhelming”. Chairman Pete Wilkinson said it would force “10 to 12 years of crippling social and environmental disruption on the county”. “It will fundamentally change the way of life in this region, cause people to lose their homes, destroy an area of outstanding natural beauty and leave us with another legacy of lethal radioactive waste,” he said.

BBC 12th March 2019 read more »

Protestors and two Suffolk councils joined forces in calling for more information from EDF on its proposals to build a new multi-million pound nuclear power plant at Sizewell. Campaign groups turned up in force to show support for Suffolk County Council and Suffolk Coastal District Council’s opposition to EDF’s current proposals, which both believe is lacking on detail and not considerate of local resident’s priorities. The county council does not have the power to force EDF to provide it with the information it wants to see before it submits a planning application. However, county councillor Richard Smith, co-chairman of the Sizewell C Joint Local Authorities Group (JLAG), has said that if they do not see the information it needs to weigh up the positives and negatives of the project, it is able to recommend to the planning inspectorate it does not approve of the plan.

East Anglian Daily Times 12th March 2019 read more »

Posted: 13 March 2019