Hinkley

A High Court judge has asked the developers of Hinkley Point C to clarify its environmental impact assessment (EIA) of mud dumping off Cardiff.

ENDS 18th Sept 2018 read more »

The judge said that EDF’s information was not accurate on a very important point – whether material from the seabed was included in the EIA.

Burnham-on-sea.com 18th Sept 2018 read more »

Two senior Labour AMs have raised concerns in the Senedd about the dumping of mud from a nuclear plant site into the sea near Cardiff. Julie Morgan and Jane Hutt – both close to leadership frontrunner Mark Drakeford – said constituents had safety worries about dredging 300,000 tonnes of mud from Hinkley Point. Dumping began last week. AMs were told the mud poses no risk to human health. Campaigners have called for more tests, and are seeking an injunction. Ms Morgan and Ms Hutt quizzed Rural Affairs Secretary Lesley Griffiths following a topical question raised by independent AM Neil McEvoy.

BBC 19th Sept 2018 read more »

The nuclear industry in the South West will play a pivotal role in sustaining the government’s growth ambitions, according to former business secretary Lord Hutton. The chair of the Nuclear Industry Association says that Hinkley Point C has “sparked” other UK nuclear projects – and will unlock billions of investment and create 12,000 jobs. Speaking at the Nuclear South West’s annual conference in Bristol, Lord Hutton said: “Hinkley is the start of an exciting new era for the nuclear industry and will be followed by further projects across the country. “These will inevitably provide major opportunities for UK industry, particularly for companies that get in early.”

Bristol Post 19th Sept 2018 read more »

Posted: 20 September 2018

Moorside

Toshiba has reportedly opened up talks with Canada’s Brookfield Asset Management to broker a deal for its Cumbrian nuclear plant NuGen.

New Civil Engineer 20th Sept 2018 read more »

Posted: 20 September 2018

World Nuclear

The International Atomic Energy Agency’s new Technical Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Operations convened last week to discuss the economic challenges facing the nuclear energy industry. While 55 nuclear power reactors are currently under construction around the world, and 30 more are in the planning stages, a significant number of plans have shut down in recent years. And many of these closures occurred before their licenses to operate expired. Economic factors are the primary culture for many of these premature shutdowns.

Daily Energy Insider 18th Sept 2018 read more »

Nuclear power could contribute to achieving the Paris Agreement targets on climate change, but it would need help of its own to do that, a new report from the International Atomic Energy agency said.

Oil Price 19th Sept 2018 read more »

Posted: 20 September 2018

Moorside

Toshiba has entered talks with Canadian asset manager Brookfield over the potential sale of its UK nuclear unit NuGen, which was slated to build the Moorside nuclear plant in Cumbria. The talks, which are at an early stage according to two people directly familiar with the matter, come after Toshiba’s negotiations with Korea’s state-owned Korean Electric Power Corp have dragged on, with an exclusivity period ending in July. Toshiba has been looking to offload NuGen as part of a wider restructuring in the wake of its financial crisis triggered by losses in its Westinghouse US nuclear business. Brookfield bought Westinghouse from Toshiba for $4.6bn in January after the US nuclear business filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy prot ection in 2017, making the Canadian company a likely candidate for the Japanese conglomerate to approach about the sale of its UK unit. While Toshiba is continuing talks with Kepco, the deal had originally aimed to be completed by the middle of this year. Toshiba declined to comment on the talks with Brookfield but said: “Toshiba continues to consider additional options including sale of its shares in NuGen to Kepco, and we are carefully monitoring the situation, in consultation with stakeholders including the UK government.”

FT 18th Sept 2018 read more »

A Canadian investor has emerged as the latest potential rescuer of a troubled nuclear power plant planned for Cumbria. Brookfield Asset Management has been in talks with Japanese corporation Toshiba over buying the proposed Moorside site. A subsidiary of Brookfield bought Toshiba’s bankrupt nuclear subsidiary Westinghouse, whose UK arm had designed the reactors for Moorside, earlier this year.

Daily Mail 19th Sept 2018 read more »

The Japanese conglomerate behind plans for Europe’s largest nuclear reactor has rubbished claims that it is in talks with a major Canadian asset manager to sell the troubled project. Toshiba branded reports linking the sale of the NuGen development company to Brookfield Asset Management as “speculation”. The debt-ridden company added that it was still considering a sale of the NuGen consortium to South Korean mega-utility Kepco. The latest rumoured suitor has emerged just months after Kepco lost its position as the preferred bidder for NuGen, which hopes to build a major nuclear plant at the Moorside site in Cumbria. According to reports Toshiba is in early stage talks with Brookfield to offload the project after its project partners fled the consortium following the collapse of its US nuclear business Westinghouse, which was also slated to provide the reactor design.

Telegraph 18th Sept 2018 read more »

Posted: 19 September 2018

Bradwell

A Chinese energy company says it would consider pulling back from control of a new UK nuclear plant to appease political sensitivities. China’s leading nuclear energy company CGN is due to operate the Bradwell plant in Essex with French energy company EDF. Under a 2016 agreement, CGN would have a 66.5 per cent stake and EDF would have the remainder when it starts generating electricity in the late 2020s or ealry 2030s. However, CGN’s chief executive Zheng Dongshan told the Financial Times (FT) CGN would be willing to consider “not being the majority operator”. Mr Zheng added: “We understand the political and local sensitivities.

iNews 18th Sept 2018 read more »

Possible Chinese withdrawal from Bradwell B ‘not surprising but still a surprise’ says BANNG. The news (Financial Times, 18 September, 2018) that the Chinese company behind Bradwell B is considering withdrawing its interest in the project because of political sensitivities ‘is not, perhaps surprising, though it comes as a surprise, nonetheless’ says BANNG’s Andy Blowers. The project may be doomed anyway as the site is totally unsuitable and is widely opposed by communities all around the Blackwater. The Chinese withdrawal, should it come, would reflect widespread concerns about the security issues surrounding their investment into a highly sensitive part of the UK’s national infrastructure. Recent manoeuvres off the disputed, Chinese-built, artificial islands in the South China Sea have increased tensions in the area and provoked warnings of Chinese investment withdrawal from the UK. It is possible that the Bradwell project could be an early victim of deteriorating relations between the two countries. In any event the project was already looking doubtful. It is facing considerable challenges in delivering vast quantities of cooling water by pipeline and the need to avoid polluting the Marine Conservation Zone which gives protection to the Colchester Native Oyster and other marine life. Most of the site is vulnerable to flooding and it will be a heroic feat to demonstrate that highly radioactive spent fuel can be safely and securely stored on the site until the end of the next century.

BANNG 18th Sept 2018 read more »

Posted: 19 September 2018

Hinkley

Workers looking to start on the Hinkley Point nuclear power plant are facing a wait of more than six weeks to get security clearance. Contractors are fuming at the delays which they fear are putting off workers from joining the job. One site source said: “I’ve worked on virtually every big nuclear site over the last few decades and it still took me eight weeks to get clearance.” Security checks for site workers are carried out by independent agencies and administered by G4S under an £80m contract awarded by client EDF Energy. Another source said: “The contractors are up in arms about this because the checks are taking so long.

Construction Enquirer 17th Sept 2018 read more »

Protesters seeking an injunction to stop the dumping of mud from Hinkley Point nuclear power station off the coast of Cardiff have had their application adjourned after the energy company behind the dumping admitted it had given inaccurate information to the High Court. In documents submitted to the court in Cardiff by NNB Generation Company (HPC) Ltd – a wholly owned subsidiary of the French energy giant EDF – it was argued that the dumping did not require an environmental impact assessment (EIA) under European regulations. However, the company’s barrister James McClelland told the court that an environmental statement was made by the company at the time it sought approval for the whole Hinkley Point C power station in Somerset, the successor to two previous nuclear power stations on the same site. Dozens of peaceful protesters assembled outside Cardiff Civil Justice Centre before the hearing, not all of whom were able to get seats in the court room. Opponents of the dumping say they fear radioactive particles present in the mud could pose a health threat. More than 100,000 people have signed petitions against the dumping.

Wales Online 17th Sept 2018 read more »

Plans to dump mud dredged from near the Hinkley Point nuclear sites in the Bristol Channel off the south Wales coast are the focus of fierce controversy. Work has already begun this month but opponents are not backing down. More than 100,000 people have signed petitions and protests have taken place outside the Welsh Assembly renewing calls for Natural Resources Wales to suspend the licence. Those opposed to the dredging argue we cannot say for sure that the 300,000 tonnes of mud that could be deposited near Cardiff is safe because a full range of tests is needed to establish there is no radioactive – and these have not been carried out. The site the mud will be dumped in is a sub-tidal sandbank just a mile off the coast of Cardiff.

Bristol Post 19th Sept 2018 read more »

The application for an Injunction opened today MONDAY 17th SEPT at the High Court in Cardiff. Protesters are optimistic. The judge gave an adjournment for 7 days to NNB GenCo (EdF) whose lawyer changed their defence to claim the EIA for the new Hinkley Point Nuclear Power station covers dumping in Welsh waters. The judge gave them 7 days to show that from the 2000-page EIA covering the development in England. Barry&Vale FoE think NNB GenCo on a loser. Natural Resources Wales has accepted that the Hinkley Point EIA does not cover dumping in the Welsh part of the Severn Estuary, where EIA is mandatory due to its Special Area of Conservation status. Moreover, an EIA for a project in Wales has to be advertised in Wales and subject to consultation by the Welsh public, which the nuclear station’s EIA was not.

Barry & Vale FoE 17th Sept 2018 read more »

Posted: 19 September 2018

New Nuclear

A new report released by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has highlighted the potential role that nuclear power could play to help meet the climate change targets. Titled ‘Climate Change and Nuclear Power 2018’, the report is an updated version of the one that was released in 2016 and includes the latest scientific information and analyses on the link between energy production and climate change. The report said that nuclear power has the potential to deliver large quantities of electricity needed for global economic development while contributing in mitigating climate change. Global electricity demand is expected to almost double by 2050.

Power Technology 18th Sept 2018 read more »

The World Nuclear Association has appealed to the United Nations and the nuclear industry to take decisive action for clean energy. “I am running out of patience,” said the organisation’s head, Agneta Rising, “I want more action and I want nuclear energy to be part of the solution because we know there is no sustainable energy future without nuclear.”

World Nuclear News 18th Sept 2018 read more »

Posted: 19 September 2018

Bradwell

CGN, China’s leading nuclear energy company, has admitted that political sensitivities could prompt it to give up the chance to operate a new atomic power plant in the UK, as the group also outlined ambitious plans for an industrial partnership with Britain. State-owned CGN would consider not running the nuclear power station it intends to build at Bradwell in Essex using its own reactor technology, said Zheng Dongshan, chief executive of the company’s UK subsidiary. CGN is due to hold a majority stake in the Bradwell plant, with France’s EDF having the remainder, under a contract signed between the two companies in 2016. But prime minister Theresa May – in contrast to her predecessor David Cameron – has put Chinese investment in the UK ‘s nuclear energy sector under increased scrutiny since she took office. She only gave the go-ahead to EDF’s plans for a new nuclear power station at Hinkley Point in south-west England – a project where CGN has a minority stake – after a special review. “We understand the political and local sensitivities,” Mr Zheng told the Financial Times. “There is no reason to restrict us as a Chinese investor . . . but we know we must take time to show the public, the government, they can trust us.” CGN, he said, would be willing to consider “not being the majority operator” at the Bradwell plant, where under its agreement with EDF the Chinese company is due to hold a 66.5 per cent stake. The plant could start generating electricity in the late 2020s or early 2030s. Should the Bradwell project proceed, it would be the first power plant in Britain to use Chinese reactor technology called the Hualong HPR1000, which has been developed by CGN and a domestic partner. The Office for Nuclear Regulation, which oversees nuclear safety and security in the UK, is currently assessing the reactor design but a final decision is expected to take at least three years.

FT 18th Sept 2018 read more »

Posted: 18 September 2018

Hualong One

The first full-scope simulator for the Chinese-developed Hualong One reactor has been delivered to the Fuqing nuclear power plant, China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) announced on 14 September. Simulators are a vital piece of equipment for training plant operators, both at the start of their careers and for their continuing training. CNNC said the new simulator passed the acceptance test and was officially delivered 115 days in advance of schedule. Experts concluded that all the indicators of the Hualong One full-scope simulator meet the relevant functional and performance requirements, it added, and the simulator is now ready to be used to train reactor operators.

World Nuclear News 17th Sept 2018 read more »

Posted: 18 September 2018

Hinkley

Developers must clarify whether dumping mud from near a nuclear plant is covered by an environmental impact assessment (EIA), a judge has said. Judge Milwyn Jarman said EDF’s evidence was “not accurate on a very important point” on whether material dredged from the seabed near Hinkley Point C site in Somerset was included in the EIA. Campaigners want an injunction to halt the dumping that began last week. A High Court hearing in Cardiff has been adjourned for seven days. About 300,000 tonnes is to be dredged from the seabed near the building site and deposited in the Cardiff Grounds, a mile off the coast of the Welsh capital. Energy firm EDF, which is behind the £19.6bn plan to build the nuclear plant, argued the mud dump was addressed in a main environment statement that formed part of the main planning application for Hinkley Point C and was approved by the UK Government. But the judge said that was not clear from a witness statement the company had submitted to court. The firm’s barrister James McClelland accepted the wording could have been made clearer. Legal action is being brought by the Campaign Against Hinkley Mud Dumping, which includes Super Furry Animals keyboard player Cian Ciaran. Campaigners asked for a temporary injunction to be imposed until the next hearing, but the request was turned down. Neil McEvoy AM said campaigners were planning to organise a blockade in an effort to halt the dumping.

BBC 17th Sept 2018 read more »

Hundreds of campaigners gathered outside the Civil Justice Courts in Cardiff today to press for a legal injunction to halt the dumping of allegedly radioactive mud in the sea off Penarth. The mud is being dredged from the shores adjacent to the Hinkley Point Nuclear power complex on the Somerset Coast and is being bropughjt across the channel by hopper to be dumped on the Cardiff Grounds – just a mile off shore from Penarth. More than 200 demonstrators gathered outside the Cardiff Civil Justice Courts this morning support an application by the Campaign Against Hinkley Mud Dumping to stop 320,000 tonnes of Hinkley Mud being dumped in the sea off Penarth. This afternoon Penarth AM Neil McEvoy said that “Defence” (i.e. the Welsh Labour Government) wants to “adjourn for a week to get their statement in order. They want to continue for a week with the dumping.”. There was also an issue regarding faulty paperwork submitted by Welsh Labour Government being deficient. Later Neil McEvoy added “They file wrongly and they are allowed to continue dumping in the meantime. Interim injunction not granted.”

Penarth News 17th Sept 2018 read more »

NFLA and KIMO call for halt in dredging of mud from the Hinkley Point site and an independent re-evaluation of the technical and scientific issues with the material, and consider raising concerns with the OSPAR Commission.

KIMO International 17th Sept 2018 read more »

Posted: 18 September 2018