Wylfa

It has been reported in the Japanese press that the struggling nuclear arm of Hitachi is proposing to postpone the Welsh nuclear power station at Wylfa by two years to 2027. The new delay is rumoured to be due to lack ability to raise finance – despite reportedly very generous support from UK government – and the risk of spiralling costs that company is refusing to absorb. The company is due to have a board meeting by the end of May where they decide whether to continue with the project given the UK government’s financial offer. Over the last few weeks, Hitachi has leaked to the Japanese press that the UK government has doubled their offer of public support for their new reactor at Wylfa to around £13 billion, that Hitachi are now also asking for price guarantees for the electricity, that the costs have risen dramatically, and most recently, that the project has been delayed by two years. The UK government states it doesn’t recognise the reports from the Japanese press but is refusing to outline what or whether a financial deal has been offered to the company. Dr Doug Parr, Chief Scientist for Greenpeace UK said: “The financial debacle that was the Hinkley deal is at risk of becoming just a starting point for new deals. Overseas nuclear companies want to build even more expensive plants than Hinkley in the UK, but with additional new demands for taxpayer support. Our government needs to realise that we should not be asked to fund the nuclear industries of other nations who want to build reactors in the UK because the public in their own backyards has rejected them. It makes absolutely no sense to waste billions on expensive and outdated nuclear power stations when technologies like offshore wind can do a similar job faster and cheaper. Nuclear is an energy landline in the age of smartphones, chaining us to a slow, expensive, out-of-date technology while the world moves on to the interconnected, reliable, high tech system that will power our homes for generations to come.”

Greenpeace 21st May 2018 read more »

Posted: 22 May 2018

Hinkley

A new multi-million pound fund has been established by Lloyds Bank to help small to medium sized firms secure supply chain opportunities on the £19.6 billion Hinkley Point C nuclear power station project. The major nuclear power station scheme in Somerset is estimated to create over 25,000 job opportunities for the regional economy, with its construction generating around £200m per year.

Construction.co.uk 21st May 2018 read more »

Posted: 22 May 2018

Brexit

Theresa May says Britain will pay to save links with part of the Euratom nuclear agency after Brexit, triggering accusations of another U-turn. The UK will seek to “fully associate ourselves” with the body’s research arm, she announced – despite the bitter row over the decision to leave Euratom as a whole. That pull-out has triggered warnings that Britain’s nuclear power stations could run out of fuel and hospitals will run short of radioactive isotopes to treat cancer patients.

Independent 21st May 2018 read more »

Posted: 22 May 2018

Radhealth

Desperate times call for desperate propaganda. Accordingly, the declining nuclear power industry would have you believe that bananas are a teensy bit too radioactive for comfort. If you eat a banana a day, they say — or for that matter live in Denver, or fly in an airplane, or salt your food with Morton’s — then you are a high-risk taker who would be far safer just living contentedly next door to a nuclear power plant. We debunked these false arguments in our 2013 report, Pandora’s False Promises (see page 30 on bananas.) At the Cop23 Climate Talks last November in Bonn, a group calling itself, oxymoronically, Nuclear for Climate, hoped delegates would once again slip on their false banana propaganda and fall for their nonsensically unscientific notion that bananas are actually more dangerous than nuclear power plants! I am not making this up. They actually handed out bananas complete with a sticker that read: “This normal, everyday banana is more radioactive than living near a nuclear power plant for one year.” We’ve long contended that these pro-nuclear front groups treat the public like readily dupable dunderheads. But it’s they who are the dunderheads if they really think we would believe this piffle. Frankly, if this is all they’ve got, then the industry rhetoric is now on a par with its finances: in full bankruptcy.

Beyond Nuclear 20th May 2018 read more »

Posted: 22 May 2018

Uranium

It’s a tale almost as old as time, except that the “White Man” has not been around as long as that. But long enough to massacre, expel, plunder, desecrate, abandon, repeat. It’s the story Native Americans know all too well — a Trail of Tears that never really ended. Sacred places and burial sites disrespected, traditions ignored, the health and well-being of people dismissed, while the fundamental civil rights of indigenous populations in the United States continue to be trampled on by the US government and its friends in industry. It would be tempting to say that the current battle over resumption of uranium mining at the sacred Mount Taylor, which sits atop one of the richest known uranium ore reserves in the country, is just the latest in this long and shameful saga. But it is not alone. There are stories like this everywhere in Indian Country — Bears Ears would be just one more example.

Beyond Nuclear 20th May 2018 read more »

Posted: 22 May 2018

SMRs

Dominion Energy is to provide funding that could lead to commercialising the BWRX-300 small modular reactor (SMR), GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH) announced today. The 300 MWe reactor is derived from GEH’s 1520 MWe Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) design.

World Nuclear News 21st May 2018 read more »

Posted: 22 May 2018

Floating Nuclear

A ceremony has been held to welcome the Akademik Lomonosov, Russia’s first floating nuclear power plant, following its arrival at Atomflot’s berth in the port city of Murmansk in the far northwest part of the country. Fuel will be loaded in to the vessel’s two reactors prior to its delivery to Russia’s northernmost city of Pevek next year.

World Nuclear News 21st May 2018 read more »

Construction Index 21st May 2018 read more »

Reuters 21st May 2018 read more »

Posted: 22 May 2018

Fukushima

Japan is poised to FLOOD the Pacific with one million tons of radioactive water contaminated by the Fukushima nuclear plant. Storage space at the abandoned facility is running dangerously low as officials race to secure the nearly 160 tons of contaminated water produced at the plant per day. As space for tanks dwindles the Japanese government and the plant’s owner Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco) may decide to dump treated water into the ocean.

Daily Mail 21st May 2018 read more »

Posted: 22 May 2018

Japan

Chugoku Electric Power Co. on May 22 took the first step toward the start of operations of the Shimane nuclear power plant’s new reactor, whose construction was halted following the March 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster. The utility, based in Hiroshima, asked the Shimane prefectural government and the Matsue city government for their consent on applying to the Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA) for safety screening of the No. 3 reactor. It marked the second time that a utility began the procedures toward the start of a new reactor that was under construction at the time the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami triggered the Fukushima accident. The first was an Oma nuclear power plant reactor in Aomori Prefecture, which is currently under construction by the Electric Power Development Co., known as J Power. Construction of the Shimane nuclear power plant’s No. 3 reactor, with an output of 1.37 gigawatts, is nearing completion. If the series of procedures go smoothly, it could become the first new nuclear reactor in Japan that starts operation after the Fukushima disaster, which prompted toughened safety standards for nuclear plants. The Shimane nuclear plant in Matsue is the only nuclear plant in Japan that is located in a prefectural capital. Its reactors are boiling water reactors, the same as those at the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, operated by Tokyo Electric Power Co.

Asahi Shimbun 22nd May 2018 read more »

Posted: 22 May 2018

Bulgaria

The Bulgarian cabinet has decided to revive the construction of the Belene nuclear power station, with China’s National Nuclear Corporation announcing its interest in investing in the controversial plant, on which construction first began in 1987, only to be discontinued three years later. Bulgaria has so far invested 3 billion leva in the project, but does not plan to spend a penny more, leaving it up to the market to do so. Energy Minister Temenuzhka Petkova announced in mid-May that by the end of 2018, a strategic investor for the power plant will be selected after parliamentary approval. However, it has since become clear that there is no government financial guarantee in place for the project, nor a commitment to buy the electricity produced.

Emerging Europe 22nd May 2018 read more »

Posted: 22 May 2018