nuClear News No.96, June 2017

 

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Posted: 6 June 2017

nuClear News No.95, May 2017

 

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Posted: 26 April 2017

Safe Energy 73, April 2017

 

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Posted: 26 April 2017

nuClear News No.94, April 2017

 

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Posted: 7 April 2017

Toshiba

Westinghouse, Toshiba’s struggling nuclear subsidiary, has hired specialist lawyers to advise on the merits of the US company filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, according to two people familiar with the appointment. However, Toshiba’s lenders are deeply divided about whether Westinghouse should pursue this option, partly because of fears that it could rapidly expose the Japanese conglomerate to new costs and cause serious reputational damage. The appointment by Westinghouse of bankruptcy experts from Weil, Gotshal & Manges, the US law firm, comes as Toshiba — which is grappling with the worst crisis in its history — strives to meet a deadline of next Tuesday to release audited results for the third quarter of 2016.

FT 9th March 2017 read more »

TOSHIBA has repeated that it is “not aware” of any plans for its American nuclear division to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. This comes following new reports saying Westinghouse Electric – part of the Japanese giant which is due to produce the three reactors which would power the proposed Cumbrian nuclear new build at Moorside, near Sellafield – has called in specialist bankruptcy lawyers.

Carlisle News and Star 9th March 2017 read more »

Posted: 10 March 2017

Moorside

Plans for a new power station are at the “core” of Copeland’s growth plans, a high-profile nuclear conference has heard. Mike Starkie, Copeland’s mayor, said the borough council gives a “warm welcome in principle” to the proposed three-reactor Moorside plant, on land next to Sellafield. He added: “It will provide a significant investment in the borough and lead to many jobs, both temporary during construction and permanently through the operation of the power station and the supporting supply chain.”

Whitehaven News 10th March 2017 read more »

Posted: 10 March 2017

EDF

French utility EDF (EDF.PA) is considering building a new gas-fired power station in the northeast of England, close to some of its existing plants, the company’s British arm said. To avoid a potential supply gap, Britain needs to invest in new generation to replace aging coal and nuclear plants set to close in the 2020s. “EDF Energy is examining the possibility of constructing a small gas-fired power station … on land adjacent to the existing power stations at West Burton in Nottinghamshire,” a spokeswoman for EDF Energy said via email late on Tuesday.

Reuters 8th March 2017 read more »

Posted: 10 March 2017

SMRs

The government is right to avoid rushing into a “quick and early decision” on small modular reactors (SMRs), a senior figure at the Energy Technologies Institute has said. Slow progress on a competition to find a best value SMR design for the UK shows that the “evidence is being properly examined”. “It is taking some time but the decision on whether you should intervene and how you should intervene is not an easy one,” said Energy Technologies Institute (ETI) nuclear strategy manager Mike Middleton at an event in London. He said ministers were right to take the time to “properly examine the evidence and what the opportunities are, as well as the potential risks, rather than take a quick and early decision.” Giving evidence to a House of Lords science and technology committee last week, energy and industry minister Jesse Norman said that the competition’s timetable had been “disturbed” but that the government was hopeful it could get it “back on track soon”. He would not be drawn on when the results of the competition will be revealed.

Utility Week 9th March 2017 read more »

Posted: 10 March 2017

Energy Costs

Offshore windfarms are set to become a cheaper source of electricity than the Hinkley Point nuclear power plant and are also on track to undercut coal-fired power stations. The Government, which has been trying to support offshore in the hope of turning the UK into a world-leader in the sector, plans to hold an auction next month in which generators will bid for a guaranteed price for their electricity, with the lowest offer declared the winner. This means that if the market price for electricity falls below that level after the turbines are built, the taxpayer will step in to make up the difference. The planned nuclear plant at Hinkley Point in Somerset has been given a guaranteed price of £92.50 per megawatt-hour (mwh) for 35 years – a generous deal that was required to reassure investors they would see a return on the hefty upfront costs of the plant. Offshore wind in Europe cost about £190/mwh in 2012, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, but this figure has nearly halved in the last five years to just over £100/mwh. And now the industry is now predicting the UK will see offshore wind become cheaper than some of the more traditional sources of power generation. While the Government has an official policy against onshore wind, it has sought to promote the more expensive offshore turbines, partly because of the chance to establish a new industry in the UK based on the expertise developed by the North Sea oil and gas industry. It appears this may be starting to pay off years earlier than anyone expected. Keith Anderson, chief corporate officer of Scottish Power, one of the main players in the wind industry, told The Independent that he was confident the April auction would see an offshore wind generator bid below the ‘strike price’ given to Hinkley Point. And Dong Energy, the Danish wind power giant, went even further. Henrik Poulsen, the firm’s chief executive officer, told Bloomberg that offshore wind could already compete with coal, depending on the conditions. “If you have a sufficiently large site with the right wind speeds, then I do believe you can build offshore wind at least at the same price as new build coal in many places around the world including the US,” he said.

Independent 9th March 2017 read more »

Posted: 10 March 2017

Politics

John McDonnell, the shadow chancellor, has promised that Labour would bring an end to nuclear power and nuclear weapons in the first 100 days of a Labour government. Speaking at a Labour meeting in July 2012, Mr McDonnell said: “From the Left now […] we should now be mapping out not in manifesto form but in a manual form the first 100 days of a Labour government going into power. “The issues around energy, you immediately announce no more nuclear power. On foreign policy, you immediately say we are coming out of Afghanistan now, we’re scrapping nuclear weapons. We would have built up popular support for those policies.

Telegraph 9th March 2017 read more »

Posted: 10 March 2017